ClaremontSerialKillerCSK


 

100 Best Things to Do in Australia

Your RVF Lifestyle

RV Road Trip

RV-ing around the world

RV Road Trip

100 Best Things to Do in Australia

by J Rogers

https://www.your-rv-lifestyle.com/things-to-do-in-australia/

Australia has a wide variety of landscapes, ranging from mountain ranges in the south-eastern and western sections, tropical rainforests in the north-east quarter, with arid and semi-arid desert in the middle. It is the sixth largest nation in the world. The capital city is Canberra.

The country has an extremely diverse way of life and is equally famous for the beautiful beaches, as it is for the rugged outback. Most visitors simply do not realise just how vast the country is!

Each state has different things to offer the tourist. Victoria is widely recognised as the cultural capital, and it is here that you will find the best food and wine. Queensland is mostly tropical, while New South Wales has magnificent beaches. Tasmania is cooler, while the western and northern territories are rugged. Capital Territory prides itself on culture, with many galleries and museums to explore.

1. The Great Barrier Reef

This is located off the coast of Queensland, and is the largest coral reef in the world. It is a huge tourist destination, with cruises and diving boats which offer special expeditions to the reef.
Diving gear is normally available to hire, when you have produced diving documentation, so be sure to take it all with you.
Make sure you book any tours in advance as they are a very popular way to see the reef.

2. Sydney Harbour Bridge

You may also hear of the bridge as ‘the Coathanger’ because of the arch shape. The bridge spans the harbour and carries vehicles, trains, bicycles and foot passengers between the central business district and the North Shore.
The bridge is an iconic feature of the harbour, it was built in 1932 and is the sixth longest spanning bridge in the world. It also ranks as the tallest arch bridge, being 44-feet from the water level to the top.
Plan on spending a day in the area, and make sure you have your camera with you.

3. Uluru

You may have also heard of this as Ayers Rock, which is the more well-known name. It is a huge sandstone rock which can be found in the Northern Territory, 335 km west of Alice Springs.
The rock is sacred to the aboriginal people of the area. The Anangu people often lead walking tours of the rock and surrounding area, and are very informative about the fauna and flora there.
If possible, try to visit at dawn or sunset when the colours are at their most spectacular.
Allow a half day or more, depending on how much exploring you want to do.

4. Sydney Opera House

This ranks as one of the most distinctive and famous of buildings to have been built in the 20th century. It was opened in 1973.
The complex covers the entire Bennelong Point on the harbour, you simply cannot miss it!
There are different venues in the complex, with over 1,500 shows each year. There are three resident companies there, namely Opera Sydney, Sydney Theatre Company, and Sydney Symphony Orchestra.
If you plan to see any show here, you must book in advance. Should you want to stay the night, you will find plenty of hotels in the area.

5. Port Jackson

This is an area, rather than a specific thing. It is where the waters of Sydney Harbour, Middle Harbour, North Harbour, Parramatta River, and Lan Cove all meet. Significantly, it is the spot where the first European settlement in the country took place.
You will remember some events which take place there, namely the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.
The harbour is also famous for the New Year’s Eve firework display.
Spend a full day looking around the area, there are many places where you can get lunch during the day.

6. Cable Beach

This magnificent beach is 6 km west of Broome, and is a 22 km stretch of beautiful white sands.
The waves are very gentle during the season from May to October. After that, there is an influx of jellyfish, so swimming is not advisable.
Take a camel ride along the beach at sunset and sunrise, and look out for the ‘clothing optional’ area, if this appeals to you.
If you head for the southern part of the beach you will find Gantheaume Point where you may be lucky to see whales and dolphins as they migrate.

7. Visit Uluru

This is the heart of the outback and well worth a visit. You will find out how the residents managed with the Royal Flying Doctor Service as their only medical help, and how they coped with fearsome desert creatures.
Be sure to check out the Reptile Park, where you will see some of them!
If you like, you can head out into the West Mac Donnell Range and hike to the top of Anzac Hill.
Make sure you stop at the historic Overland Telegraph Station, which was built in 1872 and was the first communication outpost in the area.

8. Eureka Tower

You will find this skyscraper in the Southbank area of Melbourne. It is the highest public vantage point in any building in the southern hemisphere, measuring 935 feet. The observation deck is on level 88.
This is the second tallest building in the country, and still the tallest to the roof.
On the observation deck you will find 30 viewfinders so you can check out the whole of Melbourne. There are also free binoculars which you can use. If you are brave enough, head for the small outside area called ‘The Terrace’, which fortunately is protected from the winds.
Especially for the brave, try the glass cube called ‘The Edge’, which is a glass box hanging over the edge of the tower, only adding to the experience of height!

9. Great Ocean Road

If you visit Australia, then this should be on your list of things to do! The road runs between Torquay and Allansford, for 243 km along the south-eastern coast.
The road itself is a memorial dedicated to soldiers killed during WWI, and winds over different terrain along the coast. There are several landmarks you will pass along the way such as the Twelve Apostles rock formations.
Warrnambool is the largest city along the route, so you should stop here for supplies if you need them. The road is two lanes, one in each direction, and the speed limit changes, so be aware of this and watch for the road signs.

10. The Shrine of Remembrance

This dedication is found in Melbourne. It was constructed in dedication to those who served in WWI, although bow it is a memorial to all Australians who served in wars.
The shrine is constructed of Tynong granite, containing the marble Stone of Remembrance.
Be sure to check out the engraved words ‘Greater love hath no man’. Of significance here is that once a year, on 11th November at 11am (Remembrance Day), the sun shines through the roof and lights up the word ‘love’.
Look for the crypt below which has a bronze statue of a soldier and his young son. The panels list each unit of the Australian Imperial Force.
Plan to spend a half day here, although longer if you are searching for a name on the panels.

11. Mount Kosciuszko

This mountain is part of the Australian Alps national Parks and reserves, and you will find it on the main range of the Snowy Mountains, in New South Wales.
At 2,228 m above sea level, it is the highest mountain in the country.
You will many outdoor activities here such skiing and snowboarding in the winter months, and great walking in the summertime. There are many trails for mountain biking and bushwacking. You can rent mountain bikes at some of the trails.
This is a great area to take an RV and spend a few days.

12. The Twelve Apostles

You will find this outcrop off the shore of Port Campbell National Park. It is also visible from the Great Ocean Road. This is a very popular tourist attraction.
Originally there were 12 outcrops, but over time, some have eroded and collapsed. Right now, there are only eight, as one collapsed in 2005.
The remaining outcrops are over 50 metres high. Hikers and walkers will enjoy the many trails in the area, and this is a good place to take an RV for a few days. Be aware that you must take all your provisions as there may not be anywhere to stock up on.

13. Darling Harbour

You will find this harbour in Sydney near to the city centre. It is also well-known as a recreational area, with a pedestrian precinct.
There are many attractions to be seen in the area, such as the Chinese Garden of friendship, and the Powerhouse Museum.
Madame Tussauds is there, as is the Sydney Aquarium, so it is a good idea to spend a full day here. Perhaps even book into a hotel and stay longer.

14. Queen Victoria Market

You may also hear this called the ‘Queen Vic’. It is a very well-known landmark, and the largest open-air market in the southern hemisphere. You will find it in Melbourne.
The market has been going strong since the 19th century. There used to be three markets, but the other two closed, leaving the Queen Victoria market as the oldest surviving market.
This is a very popular market, where you can find almost everything you want. It is now part of the Victorian Heritage register. If you plan to spend a full day there, you will not be disappointed.

15. K’gari (Fraser Island)

The whole island is heritage-listed, and you will find it on the south coast. It is the largest sand island in the world, with a variety of microclimates such as sand dunes, lakes, and rainforests.
The island is Queensland’s largest, as well as Australia’s 6th largest island. It is populated by only a handful of people, because tourists go there to walk and hike, before returning to the mainland.
Expect to see an abundance of plants, and a diverse range of animals including the saltwater crocodile!

Plan a day hiking or walking here, and be on the lookout for reptiles and mammals.

16. The Snowy Mountains

These are also known as ‘The Snowies’. They are the highest mountain range in the country. It is here you will find the highest mountain namely Mount Kosciuszko. There are also another five peaks above 2,100 metres high.
Look out for the ‘Mountain Plum Pine’ which is thought to be the world’s oldest living plant, it is a type of conifer.
In winter, the area is very popular with skiers and snowboarders, while in the warmer months, hiking and rambling takes precedent.
Allow yourself plenty of time to explore the area, in the warmer months it is a great place to take an RV for a few days.

17. Kata Tjuta

You will find these amazing rock formations 365 miles southwest of Alice Springs. You may also hear it called ‘The Olgas’. You will know it by the large group of domed formations.
The highest dome is Mount Olga, which is 1,066 metres above sea level.
If you enjoy hiking and walking, then this is a good place to head for. There is also coming in the area, so plan to spend a few days here and explore.

18. Melbourne Aquarium

This is no ordinary aquarium! Not only can you look at sharks – you can dive with them! Grey Nurses, Whaler Sharks, and Seven Kill Sharks, all make up the inhabitants of this complex.
You will take to the water with a fully qualified dive instructor who will ensure that your dive is not only safe but enjoyable.
You do not need any diving experience – a sense of adventure is all that is needed!
You must book your tickets in advance, and the best way to do this is online.

19. Burleigh Heads

This interesting suburb is found in the city of Gold Coast. This is very popular with surfers, and you will find the beaches a great place to barbeque and play a few cricket matches.
On Sundays the town centre is filled with buskers, and local musicians, along with fire-twirlers to keep the kids amused.
In the high street you will find an assortment of delis, cafes, and interesting shops, so it is worth spending a full day here and enjoying the atmosphere.

20. Bay of Fires

The name was given to the bay by Captain Tobias Furneaux in 1773, when he saw the fires of the Aboriginal people on the beach.
You will find that the beaches are wonderfully white, the water incredibly blue, and the outcrops an amazing colour of orange shades.
The northern area is national park, while the southern part is conservation area.
In and around the Bay of Fires there are many outdoor activities for families, such as boating, swimming, and fishing. It is also a great place for bird watching.
There is a campsite, so you can pitch a tent or take an RV and spend some time in this lovely area.

21. Dandenong

This is an area, rather than a single place. It is a suburb of Melbourne, about 30km southeast of the centre.
What makes this unique is the diverse population who live here. It is therefore, a great place to sample different types of cuisine, which will have influences such as Turkish and Albanian.
There are many eclectic shops and literally dozens of interesting restaurants, so plan to spend a full day here.

22. Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary

You will find the sanctuary in Brisbane. This sanctuary not only takes care of Koalas, but also kangaroos, wombats, and Tasmanian devils. It is the largest and oldest koala sanctuary in the world.
If you have children, then try to visit here as you get to hold the koalas! They are not allowed to be held for more than 30 minutes per day. You can also help with feeding the kangaroos.
Once a day there is an exhibition of the birds of prey, showing off their speed and incredible eyesight.
There is also a small farm where you may see sheep dog shows, so you should plan to spend the full day here to see everything!

23. Stradbroke Island

The easiest way to visit this island is to take a tour which leaves from Brisbane. The island has over 100 fresh water lakes, which you can visit. The lakes are safe to swim, or just to walk along.

Watch out for dolphins, manta rays, turtles, and even whales as you cross the water. You may also see kangaroos and koalas on the island.

There are small towns where you can buy lunch, although this is often included on trips.
If you want to stay longer, there is an excellent hotel on the island.

24. Hervey Bay Whale Watching

The best way to see whales is to take a whale watch tour, and you will find these readily available in Hervey Bay. Most of the tours last about 4 hours, and often the vessels have underwater viewing windows.
Often the tour will include your lunch and afternoon tea, so they are really good value for money. Many of them will collect you at your hotel and drop you back there. You will be able to book tickets for tours at your hotel.
Look out for Humpbacks on their annual migration. Note that the tours are seasonal, so check to make sure they are running, don’t assume they are.

25. Tully and Barron River

If you enjoy water sports, then make sure you head here for some water rafting, and rapid riding. You will need to go with a group of like-minded people, and the adventure will take about five hours.
The river rafting tours are suitable for kids as well as adults and carry on all year round. Both rivers offer rafting opportunities, with no previous experience being needed. All training is given on the day by professional rafters.
Allow yourself a full day here, and make sure you bring dry, warm clothing for when you are done.

26. Kurunda Scenic Railway

This railway runs from Cairns to Kurunda, and snakes its way through the Macalister mountain range. It used to be used as a regular commuter train, but it is not only used for tourists. It operates daily apart from Christmas day.
The journey will take about 2 hours and will pass through the most beautiful terrain, on the climb to the falls. The tropical gardens are a delight to see and a very well-known attraction.
You will get the opportunity for photos as the train stops at a lookout, where you can see Barron Falls. Look out for Stoney Creek Falls as you pass, as they are just a few metres from the train.
Near the station you will find a zoo where you can feed kangaroos and hold the koalas. There is also an information centre and a gift shop.
Allow yourself a full day for this, as you can then spend some time in the town.

27. Queenstown Winery Tour

This half day tour is available in Queenstown, and it is a great idea to take advantage of it. You will get to see three different wineries, as well as take a tour of an underground wine cave.
The tours normally start in the afternoon, and for an extra fee you can visit a craft beer tasting centre.
Each vineyard will select some wines to sample along with snacks, so you will not go hungry!
The guides are normally very knowledgeable about the wines you taste, having a passion for wine themselves, so you will be well cared for.
These tours are not suitable for children.

28. Phillip Island

This island is found about 140 km south-east of Melbourne. It was named after the first governor of New South Wales. The island forms a natural breakwater for the shallow waters in Western Port.
The island is connected to the mainland by a bridge, which was originally made of wood. The population of the island is about 10,000, although in the summer it increases to 40,000. Most of the island is for grazing cattle and sheep.
If you enjoy wildlife, this will delight you. The island has a significant population of penguins and pacific gulls. You may also see wallabies and kangaroos, who are tame enough to be fed.
Make sure you head to the western side as this is where you will find the largest colony of seals in Australia.
Plan on spending a full day here and enjoy the amazing wildlife!

29. Take a Wild Tour

These tours are a great way to see wildlife. They leave from many Melbourne hotels, and are normally in small groups.

Most of them include a picnic lunch. You will take a guided walk through the bush, and visit the wildlife sanctuary, which has koalas in their natural environment. Look out for tribes of emus, and flocks of cockatoos.

The tour company will arrange pick-up and drop off from your hotel, making this is a very easy way to see the natural side of the country

30. Nitmiluk National Park

This national park is 244 km southeast of Darwin. There are a series of gorges which are accessible by flat bottomed boat or canoe.
In the dry season, the water level is lower, so the gorges do not run into each other, but in the rainy season you can explore them together.
You will find a visitor centre at Katherine Gorge which is about 30 km east of the town of Katherine. There you will find maps that explain the layout of the gorges, and the landscape. Tours are available to book here, if you prefer.
This is a great place to spend a few days, you will find two permanent campsites for both tents and RV’s.

31. Lord Howe Island

You will find this small island in the Tasman Sea. It is east of Port Macquarie. It has a very diverse terrain, but is best known for the beautiful, sandy beaches.
You will also find subtropical forests here with clear streams. There are many trails, but the best one is the trail that winds up Mount Gower, where you will have the most amazing views!
Look out for seabird colonies, which include Masked Boobies. If you enjoy scuba diving or snorkeling, then be sure to take your equipment with you as you can do this on Admiralty Island, which is nearby.

32. Royal Botanical Gardens

These gardens are in Melbourne and were founded in 1846. The garden extends to the river, with trees, landscaped gardens, and lakes. You will find over 50,000 different plants here from 8,500 species.
Look out for the algae and fungi collections which are one of the most comprehensive in Australia.
There is a café where you can get lunch, so plan to spend most of the day here, and enjoy the gardens.

33. Blue Mountains

The name comes from the natural blue haze which is created by the eucalyptus forests in the area. You can get to the Blue Mountains from Katoomba by train, as it only takes about two hours.

The whole area is filled on interesting things you can do, such as take the glass-floored cable car to the top of a peak.

There is an Aboriginal tour which will take you through the Blue Mountains, and this departs from Faulconbridge Train Station.

If you enjoy hiking, then you will love the many trails which take you to secret waterfalls and valleys.

Rock climbing is very popular, and you will also see abseiling.

This is a great place to take an RV, spend a few days, and get to know the area.

34. Margaret River Distillery Tour

The best way to visit this area is to join a tour. These leave from the main car park at the Margaret River Centre, and you will visit four delightful distilleries through the day.

The area is famous for beer, wine, and gin, and you will be plied with interesting cocktails through the day.

Lunch is included in these tours, making them very good value for money. These are not recommended for children.

35. Hobart

This is the capital of Tasmania, and the second oldest city in the country. You will find it on the south-east side of Tasmania.

Hobart was founded in 1804 as a penal colony, and you will find the city steeped in history. One of the best ways to see the city is to take a guided tour. These are available three times a day and for different lengths of time. The River Derwent runs through the town, and there are many small cafes along the front.

Close by you will find Battery Point which is an historic district. Look out for the Colonial cottages.

In the distance you can see Mount Wellington, which is 1,270 metres high and has plenty of hiking and cycling trails.

Make sure you check online for upcoming events and plan a night in the city.

It is well worth spending a few days here. There are many hotels in all price ranges.

36. Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary

This is regarded as the best wildlife park on the Gold Coast. You will find it in Currumbin. It also has the cheapest entry tickets!
Make sure you visit the wildlife hospital where you can see animals who are recovering from injury and illness. You may see kangaroos, crocodiles, and many others.
You can hand feed some of the animals, and also stay for feeding time at the Rainbow Lorikeet house.
Make sure you get your photo taken with a cuddly Koala bear!

37. Daintree Rainforest

You will find this rainforest in the north-east section of Queensland. It covers 1,200 square km, making it the largest tropical rainforest in the country. In fact, the rainforest grows right down to the coast, and the edge of the sea.
If you enjoy hiking, camping, walking, and investigating flora of all sorts, then make sure you head here. Accommodation is available in the way of camping, glamping, or in the luxury eco resort.
This is one of the oldest rainforests left in the world, so you should not miss the opportunity to see it.

38. Lake Eyre

This is also known as Kati Thanda, and is the lowest natural point in the country, being at 15 metres below sea level. When the lake fills it becomes the largest lake in Australia.
An interesting point here is that when the lake fills, it is as salty as the sea, although when it dries up, the water evaporates, and the saltiness is increased.
The lake was named after John Edward Eyre, the first European to set eyes on it, back in 1840.
This is a good place to bring an RV, you can hike around in the day, and barbeque in the evenings.

39. Salamanca Market

You will find this street market in Hobart. The market days are held on Saturdays, although in January and February, the are also held on Sundays.
Whatever you want, you are most likely to find here, with over 300 stallholders, selling things from gourmet produce to arts and crafts.
In the immediate vicinity, you will find hotels, bars, and restaurants, so it is worth spending a night or two here when the market is on.

40. Bungy Jumping and Minjin Swing

This is for those who like adventures while they travel. You will find these right outside Cairns. The bungy Tower offers two of the best adrenaline rushes you could ask for, in the same location.
The bungy jump has over 16 different jump styles to choose from, while the swing allows you to pair up with a friend for the ride of your life.
The views, of course, are spectacular- if you have your eyes open!

41.The Three Sisters

This is a very unusual rock formation in the Blue Mountains. They are close to the town of Katoomba.
Legend has it that three sisters from one village fell in love with three men from another village. They were forbidden, by law to marry. The men planned to capture the women and run off with them, and a tribal battle began. The sisters were turned into stone by an elder, who was then killed before he could turn them back.
Whatever you believe, it is a spectacular spot to visit, with great hiking and amazing views!

42. The Giant Stairway

This is not too far from Katoomba. It is a bushwacking trail which will lead you to the Three Sisters, and further down to the floor of the Valley. To each the floor you will need to use the steps – 800 of them!
The trail will take you about an hour and a half, with great views along the way.
If you do not feel you can negotiate the steps, you can also reach the floor of the Valley by train which leaves from Katoomba.

43. City of Perth

The city of Perth is found next to the Swan River, and is one of the most isolated capital cities in the world. You will find that it is near to the Australian bushland, which gives the city an ‘outdoor’ feel.
Perth is full of interesting things to see and do. You may visit the Pinnacle’s Deserts limestone pillars, or take a trip to the Margaret River wine region.
In the southern parts you will find forests with formidable trees.
It is worth booking into a hotel for a few nights, and exploring the area.

44. Cairns Wildlife Dome

This is an all-weather wildlife exhibit which you will find on top of the iconic Reef Hotel Casino.
This is one of the leading zoos in the country, and is enclosed in a 20-metre high glass dome. You will find birds, pythons, turtles, and crocodiles, to name a few of the animals there.
You can buy a ticket which will last you for four days, so you can take your time and see all there is to see. This is an excellent way to see the zoo, and all the animals.

45. Bondi Beach

You will find this very popular beach about 7km east of Sydney. It is one of the most visited beaches in the country. You may know of some of the competitions which are held here every year.
The area hosts the National Rugby League, as well as the City to Surf run, which happens every year in August. This is a fun run, attracting over 60,000 entrants.
You may be there when the Flickerfest takes place in January. This is an international short film festival.
There is a beach market which takes place every Sunday, and a food market at Christmas.
If you are staying in the area, then you will see many families spending Christmas Day on the beach.

46. Brisbane River

This river flows through Brisbane, and is the longest river in Queensland. The river starts at Mount Stanley and has been dammed to form lakes along the way.
You may remember that the largest ship to be built on the river was the Robert Miller. You might be lucky and see bull sharks, which appear from time to time.
If you fish, they you may catch lungfish and river cod. There are 16 bridges that cross the river, and the Clem Jones Tunnel is the first underground crossing for transport.
Plan to spend a full day in the area so that you can grab a bite along the river, and explore the surroundings.

47. Nambung National Park

You will find this park in western Australia, 17 km south of the town of Cervantes. In the park, you will find the Pinnacles Desert which has the most amazing limestone formations.
You will also find beaches here at Kangaroo Point, and Hangover Bay, with beautiful coastal dunes and flowering plants.
If you head for the northern part of the park, there is a boardwalk which lets you see thrombolites, which are over 3 million years old.
Allow yourself a full day here, and take a packed lunch if you do, as well as water.

48. Melbourne Cricket Ground

This sports venue is found in Yarra Park, Melbourne. It is home to the Melbourne Cricket Club, and the 10th largest stadium in the world. It has the tallest light towers of any sporting venue in the world.
You can walk to the complex from the city centre. One of the most popular events is the annual Boxing Day Test, although many other events are hosted through the year.
If you plan to see any event, you must book in advance to avoid disappointment.

49. Skydive over Byron Bay

If you have never done a skydive before, then this is the place to try it! Not only is the scenery magnificent, but you get 60 seconds to look at it while you are in freefall. It is a great idea to have a video of the skydive, this is so different from regular holiday photos!
If you are not jumping, you can watch your friend land, this may make you change your mind!
You must book this in advance as they get extremely popular especially around Mother’s Day, ot public holidays.

50. Lone Pine Sanctuary

This is the world’s largest Koala sanctuary in the world, and it is one of Brisbane’s most popular tourist attraction. There are over 130 Koalas who live there.
This is a fund day out for the family, you get to cuddly the Koalas anytime you like, and feed the kangaroos.
Another animal you will see is the rare Platypus. There are shows that take place through the day, and great entertainment for all ages. You should plan to spend the entire day here.

51. Kings Cross Farmhouse Restaurant

This is one place you should try, if you are in Melbourne. It’s a local restaurant who uses locally sourced products.
Try the trout or the Blue Crab, and you will not be disappointed. Mind you, the dessert menu is also fantastic!
The restaurant has a very impressive wine and beer menu, and the staff make it a great place for a delightful evening meal. You must book your table as it gets very full.

52. Royal Botanic Garden

This garden is found in the middle of Sydney. It opened in 1816, and is still the oldest botanical garden in the country.
The garden is open every day of the year, and better still – it is free to enter. The stunning views of the harbour and the opera house make it a delightful venue to spend an afternoon.
The gardens are formed into an amphitheatre and are divided into four different areas, namely Lower Gardens, Middle Gardens, Palace Gardens, and the Bennelong section. In each section, you will find smaller gardens, with a café area in the middle of this layout. At the café you will find a visitor’s centre and a bookshop.
It is worth spending a full day here, certainly you will want to do this if you are interested in gardening.

53. Cape Tribulation

You will find this headland in Queensland, in the Shire of Douglas. Back in the mid 80’s the population was around 300, with the area being mostly popular with hikers.
Since then hostels and resorts have been built to cater for tourists. There is accommodation to suit all budgets.
The best time to visit is between July and November, when swimming is the best, with no stingers in the water.
If you plan to stay, then be sure to book your accommodation in advance.

54. Tjapukai Aboriginal Cultural Park

If you want to see and learn about the incredible traditions of the Aboriginal people, then this is a ‘must’. The park lies between cairns and Palm Cove. Spend a whole evening here, and enjoy the traditional music and dance routine.
There is an art gallery where you can see interesting pieces. After that you will be able to sample a selection of native spiced canapes, before you attend a face painting session!
There is a dance ceremony and a fire-making ceremony, with dinner served at a relaxed pace.
You will be served traditional food, prepared by Tjapukai chefs. You may get to taste kangaroo burgers, or grilled mackerel.
The entire evening lasts only from 7-9.30, so it is not a late night, but well worth seeing!

55. The Rocks

This is an area, rather than a thing. It is a tourist area in the historic section of Sydney. It was the site of the first European settlement in the country, in 1788.
You will find wonderful views of the harbour bridge, as well as many historic buildings.
Be sure to check out the two oldest pubs in Sydney, namely the Fortune of War, and the Lord Nelson. There are many other pubs close by, and many interesting restaurants, art and gift shops.
Be sure to explore the colourful history of this area.

Try to make time to see Susannah Place Museum while you are there. It is a good idea to spend a full day here, as there is plenty to see and do.

56. Fish at the Rocks Restaurant

If you enjoy seafood, then you need to head here to taste some delicious seafood dishes. You will find the restaurant in Sydney.
Try the oysters and calamari for starters, and maybe the linguini for the main course.
If you are a dessert lover then be sure to ask for the apple and rhubarb crumble, which is truly delicious!
If you cannot make up your mind for a choice of wine, the staff will bring you a sample of each!

57. Snorkelling around Green Island

If you enjoy seeing life under the water, then treat yourself to a trip here. Leaving from cairns, you will head for the very popular Green Island, in a glass-bottomed boat.
After you have snorkeled to your heart’s content, be sure to check out the island, as it is a nature lover’s paradise! There is a self-guided tour you can take around the island, stopping for a dip in the island swimming pool, if you like.
Other things you may enjoy are parasailing or helicopter rides. You will find a well-informed visitor centre, and a café where you can get lunch, so you should plan to spend a full day here.

58. Salamanca Place

You will find this area in Hobart. What used to be warehouses, have now been transformed into beautiful restaurants, gift shops, galleries, and offices.
Enjoy visiting some of the local bars which you will find down at the wharf. The area is one of the most visited attractions here in the year.
While you are there, try to see the market, which is held on Saturdays.
If you are here after dark, you will find the area alive with music and people. There are many hotels in the area, so you could stay a day or two.
An interesting point here is that Salamanca Place is found on the Australian game of Monopoly.

59. Luna Park

If you have kids, then this is where you simply need to go! Even adults will thoroughly enjoy a day here! This amusement park is found in St Kilda, Melbourne. It was opened in 1912.
You will find the oldest operating roller coaster in the world here. It is one of only three where a brakeman stands in the middle of the train.
The park is filled with rides of all types, such as the Japanese built pirate ship, Twin Dragon, and the Holodeck, which is a motion simulator ride, to name a few.
Plan to spend the entire day here, the kids will not want to leave!

60. Penguin Island

The only way for you to get to this island is by boat, which you can arrange in Shoalwater. Camping is allowed on the island, for up to five days at a time.
You will be able to meet dolphins, over the side of the boat, and see them cajole about in the water right next to you.
The island has other interesting things to see such as birds and wildlife. The island is also very good for fishing and swimming, and a very pleasant way to get away and relax for a few days.
Be aware that there are no cafes on the island, so you need to carry all you need with you.

61. The Pub at Aussie World

You may be surprised to learn that this is one of the main attractions in Queensland, and is well deserving of a visit.
Aussie World is also the place for you to buy any special souvenirs from your visit, as it has a great gift store.
The Pub is open from 9am till late and has delicious lunch and dinner menus. They specialise in local produce and the feature of the day is often grilled steaks.
There is no better way to spend an afternoon relaxing with an ice cold beer.

You will also find a range of upmarket shops, and plenty of small cafes, making this is a good place to spend a full day.

62. Yarra River

You will find this is Victoria, and emptying into Hobsons’ Bay in Port Phillip. Originally the river was used for agriculture, and later mining, although now it is used for container shipping from Port of Melbourne.
For the public, the river means swimming, canoeing, kayaking, and rowing, and a good day out in the fresh air.
Try to visit at the annual Moomba Festival which is celebrated along the river.

63. Mount Coot-tha-Lookout

You will find this interesting place near Brisbane. It is a very popular spot for fantastic views of the greater Brisbane area.
There are buses which will take you up to the top, and bring you back down again, and there are places where you can get snacks and refreshments.
It will only take a half day to see this, but the views are worth it.

64. Wave Rock

This is one of Western Australia’s most spectacular and unique rock formations. The ‘wave’ is about 14 metres high and 110 metres long. It was formed millions of years ago. The formation is in the exact same shape as you would find in the ocean.
Pack yourself a picnic lunch, or join one of the many tours which go there, and enjoy exploring this amazing spot. There is an entrance fee at get close, although you will find it worth the amount. Remember to take a camera!

65. Legoland

This is in Melbourne. Regardless of whether you have children or not, this is a ‘must see’. There are 5 Lego play areas where the kids can get as creative as they like.
There is also a 4D cinema, and gift shop where you can pick up some of the latest additions to the Lego family.
There is a café, so you will have no excuse to leave early!

66. Whitsunday Islands

There are no less than 74 islands in this group! It is a very popular destination for tourists, and it is between Queensland and the Great Barrier Reef.
If you enjoy walking, then look for the trail called the Ngara Sea Trail Great walk. This is a combination of short walks, and sea ways, which cross some of the islands, namely South Molle, Hook, and Whitsunday.
You can camp at 8 areas on three of the islands, and this is great for sailing, powerboating, or kayaking.
There is varied accommodation available, to suit all budgets, so you may want to book a few nights and enjoy the area.

67. Jenolan Caves

You will find the caves in the Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. They are about 30 km west of Katoomba.
These are the oldest open caves in the world, and are well-known for their beauty. The caves are still being explored, although tourists have eleven caves to view.
To view these amazing caves will take you a half day, and then you may want to head into the town and have a look around there.

68. Valley of the Giants

You will find this forest of giants near Walpole, in the south-east part of the country. Be ready to be awed by their magnificence.
These giant red tingle trees grow to as high as 40 metres, and are unique to this area. There is a treetop walk which you should try, unless you are afraid of heights!
The walk will give you an idea of just how tall the trees are, and of course, the view from the top is amazing.
When you come down into the boardwalk below, you can follow the Ancient Empire Walk, which winds around the trees. Some of the trunks are up to 15 meters in circumference.
These are among the tallest trees in the world. There are other attractions here, such as a perfect swimming and picnic spot.
Be sure to look for the oldest eucalypt, which is not far from the giant Tingle Tree.

69. Kakadu National Park

You will find this 171 km southeast of Darwin. The park is enormous, covering an area of almost 200 km north to south, and over 100 km east to west. Put another way, it is half the size of Switzerland!
Here you will find some of the best examples of aboriginal rock art in the country. Look for the Nourlangie and Ubirr sites, where you will find the rocks.
If you are a bird watcher, then this will delight you, as over 30% of the country’s bird species can be found here.
You are very likely to see large saltwater crocodiles at Yellow Water, and East Alligator River, and you may be interested to know that this was where Crocodile Dundee was filmed. Make sure you take care around any crocs as they are dangerous.
You are welcome to fish in the park, but hunting is forbidden. You have the option of several places to stay, if you want to spend a few days here.

70. Taronga Zoo

This zoo has one of the finest collection of animals in the entire country. To get here, you need to take a ferry from Circular Quay, in Sydney Harbour. Often you can buy your ferry ticket zoo entrance together, which works out cheaper.
You will see the opera house from the water, which is spectacular! In the zoo, you will see zebras, kangaroos, and many other animals. The ticket includes a Sky Safari Cable Car ride, which lets you see the zoo from above.
Plan to stay the day, as you can buy lunch there, and take your time.

71.Whitehaven Beach

This beach is found along Whitsunday Island and can be reached by either boat, helicopter, or seaplane. The pure white sand is made of 98% silica, which gives it the amazing colour.
It is very popular with tourists as it makes the perfect place for a barbeque, and swimming.
There are camping facilities, so you can stay a few days and enjoy the outdoor life.

72. Port Arthur Historic Site

A good way to see this (as there is plenty to see) is to buy a two-day pass, which allows you to see things at your leisure. Some passes even include a Carnavon bay cruise, so look out for these.
There are over 30 historical buildings that you can visit, to learn about the colonial convict history. There is a museum, Interpretation gallery, and Dockyard, to mention just a few places.
There are plenty of hotels in all price ranges, making this is a good place to stay a few days.

73. Lake McKenzie

This is also called Boorangoora, and is found on Fraser Island, in the Great Sandy National Park.
Locals regard this as a wonderful family area, with pure white sands around the lake, and excellent picnic facilities, with even the toilets being of a high standard!
Allow yourself a full day here, pack a picnic and enjoy the area.

74. Yarra Valley

Yarra valley is the area which surrounds the Yarra River. So, while this is not one particular place, it is an area that you should try to explore.
There are many delightful towns in the region such as Woori Yallock, which is very popular with tourists.
If you enjoy walking, then you will find plenty of great trails to follow such as the Lilydale to Warburton Trail.
The area is well-known for wine growing, and there are numerous wineries that you can visit, and sample the wine, then perhaps buy a few bottles.

Make sure you check online for any upcoming events in the valley.

It is a good idea to take an RV around this area, and spend a few days exploring it.

75. The Ekka

This used to be called the Royal Queensland Show, and it is an agricultural show which is held annually at the Brisbane Showgrounds.
The show is Queensland’s largest annual event, so be prepared for it to be busy, as over 400,000 visitors arrive each year.
There are normally over 21,000 competition entrants in various events such as animals, and food sections.
Try to stay until nightfall, as there is always great entertainment well into the evenings.
The show is normally held over a week towards the end of August.

76. National Maritime Museum

This is a great place for people of all ages. The museum is found in Darling Harbour, Sydney.
There are many exhibits which are designed to be ‘hands-on’, so are perfect for kids of all ages. You can go aboard one of the famous vessels the dock at the harbour, so be sure to check when they are due.
There is a Mini Mariners Play Zone for the younger ones, and plenty of cinematic experiences where you can learn about the history of the Navy.
Allow yourself most of the day to see this, especially if there are interesting ships that have docked.

77. Kalbarri National Park

The park is situated 485 km north of Perth. The major tourist attraction is the Murchison Gorge, which runs for over 80 km down the lower part of the river.
The park is open all year round and is great for hiking and rambling. Winters are warm with moderate amounts of rain, while summers can get extremely hot, with temperatures often reaching above 40 degrees Celsius.
You must watch the rainfall if you want to hike in the park during the months of May through August as some roads to the gorge will be closed.

78. Tour Melbourne

Probably one of the best ways to explore Melbourne is to take a guided tour. This way you get to ask as many questions as you like, and your guide will answer them.
Most tours will take you through Sovereign Hill, which is a ‘frozen in time’ village from the 1800’s. You will be able to try your hand at panning for gold here.
Other things you may see include the Eureka Stockade, and Ballarat Wildlife Park, where you will be able to get lunch (included on most tours)
Allow yourself a full day here, whether you explore on your own, or take a tour, as there is plenty to see and do.

79. Cairns Cruise

If you do not snorkel or dive, and still want to see the Great Barrier Reef, then why not take a cruise?
Most cruise boats have glass bottoms to allow you to see the amazing sights below. You will find the tour guides very knowledgeable about the reef, and they will point out many interesting things and fish.
Snorkelers can get in the water when the boats stop. You will be served lunch on board, and maybe afternoon tea.

80. Tallebudgera Creek

If you enjoy outdoor activities, then this will appeal to you. You will find the creek in Burleigh Heads National Park. Kayaking is the most popular pastime here, although canoeing is also popular.
Walking and hiking through the area is a great experience, as there are many different plants and animals to see while you explore.
The beaches are lovely, and you can pack a picnic lunch while you relax on the warm sands.
Close by is the Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, where you can cuddle the Koalas, so it is worth planning a full day in the area.

81. Hot Air Balloon over Hinterland

If you want to see the landscape from a different angle, then try a hot air balloon flight. You can book this at Gold Coast Hinterland, and most flights last 30 minutes, although you can book longer ones if you like.
Balloon rides will take you over the rim of the Gold Coast, with the most spectacular views!
Be sure to check out their special birthday offers and champagne breakfasts.

This may not be the ride for you, if you are afraid of heights, but it is a great way to start the day!

82. Ningaloo Coast

This site is found in the western part of the country, along the East Indian Ocean. The Ningaloo Reef runs for 260 km along the coastline, and is the largest coral reef this close to the shore.
Walking is exceptional along the shoreline, and up on the cliffs, where you may catch sight of sharks. There are between 300 and 500 whale sharks who move through the waters.
Very close to the shoreline, you may see mangroves. There are estuaries and lagoons, as well as rocky shores, all worth exploring.
This is a great place to take an RV, spend a few days, and enjoy the area.

83. Circular Quay

You will find this harbour in Sydney, on the northern edge of the business centre. It is a very popular area for tourists, with many walkways, parks, and restaurants.
If you happen to be here at New Year, then this is where you will find people gather to watch the fireworks, and see the New Year in.
In the area you will also find the Museum of Contemporary Art, and the City Library.
Well worth spending a full day here, as there is a lot to see and do.

84. Quarantine Station

You will find this in Sydney. It is possibly the most haunted site in the country! For this reason, you may choose to go on a tour with other people, instead of alone!
These tours take about two and a half hours, and are normally only for adults, so don’t be tempted to bring the kids as they will not be allowed.
You get to visit the hospital, the morgue, and the shower block, among other things. No doubt you will hear all manner of noises as you explore the station.
Allow a full evening for this, then allow yourself a stiff drink afterwards!

85. Indoor Skydiving

If you just don’t fancy making a real skydive, then this may appeal to you. You will find the centre in Sydney, in Surfers’ paradise.
You’ll receive a comprehensive training session, so you know what to expect, and the instructors will be at hand if you need them.
Your entrance fee includes two flights and a flight certificate afterwards. You can get a video and photographs of your flight, as a keepsake.

86. Museum of Tropical Queensland

This is the perfect venue for adults and kids alike. The museum is located in Townsville, and has a huge amount of information of fauna and flora of the country.
You will learn all about the Great Barrier Reef, and Queensland in general. Many exhibits are designed for the kids and are interactive.
There is a place where you can get lunch, so if you have a bad weather day, then plan to spend it here.

87. Freycinet National Park

This park is found on the east coast of Tasmania, about 125 km northeast of Hobart. It was founded in 1916, and is the oldest park in Tasmania.
Be sure to visit Wineglass bay, which has been voted one of the ten best beaches in the world. Look out for the magnificent pink and red granite rock formations, and the jagged peaks, locally known as ‘The Hazards’.
This is the perfect place to escape to, if you enjoy walking through the bush or strolling along unspoilt beaches.

88. Carlton Brewhouse

This brewery is on the banks of the Yarra River. It is the largest brewery in Australia, and has been working for over 150 years.
Once at the brewery, you can join the guided tour which will take you around the brewery and show you the process. You will also get to sample some of the famous beers that are produced there.
There is a great restaurant and beer garden where you can relax after the tour, and have lunch, and a beer. Allow a half day for this, and make sure any visitors are over the age of 18.

89. Jet Boat on the Gold Coast

This is a great, exciting family adventure! Certainly a ‘must do’ part of your holiday! You can book your ride at Surfer’s Paradise.
You’ll love the 360-degree spins, and the wake surfing of this thrill ride along the coast! The rides take about an hour, and pass Wavebreak Island and Sovereign Island before weaving through the Aldershots mangrove channel.
After the boat ride, you may want to spend the afternoon looking around the area. There are plenty of restaurants and iconic shops to see.

90. Comedy Lounge

You will find this in Melbourne, and if you enjoy comedy shows, then be sure to head here. You will enjoy an evening of stand-up comedy, with laughs a second, with some well-known comedians.
This is in fact the longest running comedy club in the country. The shows normally last about 2.5 hours, with the option of dinner afterwards.
You must purchase your tickets in advance, either online or at the ticket office.

91. Low Isles

You get here by sailing from Port Douglas, and this is a great way to spend a day with the family. You can moor up in calm waters in the lagoon, and spend the day exploring the island.
There are boat trips that leave from the island, whish take you around the area. Normally these have glass bottoms, so you get to see the amazing marine life. Turtles are often to be see, as are many brightly coloured fish.
Allow yourself a full day here.

92. Kings Park

This is to be found on the west side of Perth. It is a combination of grassland, bushland, and botanical gardens. The views are superb of the Swan River and Darling Mountains.
There are over 80 bird species here, as well as over 200 fungi species. The park is the habitat of over 324 native plants.
This is the biggest inner-city park in the world, and also the most popular tourist destination in the country. In area, this park is larger than New York Central Park.
Look out for the State War Memorial and the Royal Kings Park Tennis Club.
If possible, try to visit during September, when the park hosts the largest wildflower show in the country.

93. See Skypoint

You will find this in Surfer’s Paradise. It is the highest point on the Gold Coast. This is not for the faint-hearted! Neither is it recommended if you are afraid of heights.
The climb lasts about 90 minutes, and will take you right to the top of the largest residential building in the world. You will have climbed over 270 metres above sea level.
If this isn’t enough, you then have the opportunity of walking around the edge of the building with a sheer drop right below you!
This is an incredible opportunity, and if you can, you should try it!

94. Cradle Mountain National Park

This park is just beautiful! This is in Tasmania near the towns of Deloraine, and Carrick. Cascading waterfalls, spectacular landscapes, and breath-taking views are what you will find here.
For hikers, there is a trail called the ‘Enchanted Forest Walk’, which is well worth taking. You will find amazing views of Dove Lake along the way.
Look out for wombats and wallabies along the way, and even a platypus or two!

Allow a full day to appreciate the beauty of this park.

95. Palm Valley

You may want to take a guided tour which leaves from Alice Springs. You will head off in a 4WD vehicle on a safari adventure, through beautiful rugged terrain.
You will pass through Finke Gorge national Park, and get to see the art gallery at Hermannsburg Aboriginal Community.
Allow yourself a full day for this, lunch is included in the tours.

96. Do a Bungy Jump

Australia is the home of Bungy Jumping, and this is possibly the ultimate adrenaline rush! As long as you are 10 years and older, you can have a go.
Head for Cairns, and you will find the fist bungy jump location in the country. Cairns is also home to the World record for the most jumps in 24 hours – a staggering 542!
After your jump you will receive a t-shirt and a certificate – if you are brave enough!

97. Visit the Tasman Peninsula

This is best done with a guided tour, which leaves from Hobart and takes about 3 hours. This is the best way (unless you have your own boat) to get down to the peninsula.
The trip winds along the shore of the Tasman national Park where you will see falcons and seals, before stopping at the Port Arthur Historic Site. Lunch in included here.
From the boat you will be able to see some of the southern hemisphere’s tallest sea cliffs, and you may get to see peregrine falcons who nest there.
Dolphins, seals, and even whales have been spotted here.

98. See Ramsey Street

No doubt you are familiar with the television series ‘Neighbours’. Well, here in Melbourne, you will be able to see the official Ramsey Street. Neighbours is the longest running soap series in Australia.
You can get behind the scenes to see how the show is produced, and who knows, you may even get to meet a star of the show!
Allow yourself a half day here.

99. Explore Boggo Road Gaol

You will find the gaol in Brisbane. The prison is famous for the dramatic escapes in the 80’s, the infamous inmates, and roof top protests.
You can learn about how the prison was run, and visit the gatehouse, yards, and F Wing where the rooftop protests were held in 1988.
Make sure you look out for the plaque with the story of the cat called Tripod, and read about Slim Halliday, who escaped twice!

Summary of 100 Best Things to Do in Australia

Although Australia is mostly desert, or semi-desert, you will find there are a diverse range of terrains, from tropical forests to beautiful beaches, and everything in between!

Australia has the greatest number of reptiles of any other country, with over 750 species, and because of the age of the country, you will find extreme weather patterns. This works to an advantage, because the country is popular with people who enjoy the outdoor lifestyle, as well as people who like to be indoors.

Whatever you enjoy when you take a holiday, there will be something in this vast country that appeals to you.

Claremont Serial Killer News Upate

Bradley Roger Edwards Under be 24 Hour Suicide and Possible Harm Watch



Bradley Robert Edwards in his last year at Gosnells High School 1985



Bradley Robert Edwards after his arrest

 

A Perth Newspaper reported on the Community Award given to Bradley Robert Edwards




As a result of AWN.bz warning the solicitors  representing Bradley Edwards and John Quigley the Attorney General for Western Australia  that it likely that there will be an attempt to to have  Bradley Robert Edwards murdered in Prison while  waiting to be   provided a copy of the evidence supporting the charges of being the sole person to have abducted and murdered Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, there been has assurances by the Western Australian Prison Department
that Bradley Robert Edwards will stay under 24 hours suicide and harm watch to make sure there is no chance of Bradley Robert Edwards being murdered in prison, with Prison officers falsely making out that Bradley Roberts Edwards committed suicide.
One of the reasons why there maybe an attempt to murder Bradley Robert Edwards in prison and make it look like a suicide is because the Western Australian Police Service may not have  the evidence supporting their public claim that Bradley Robert Edwards was the sole person responsible for the Abductions and Murders of Jane Rimmer.
There are strong rumours coming from Insiders in the Western Australian Police Service that the arrest of Bradley Robert Edwards in December 2016 just before the March 2017 Western Australian State Elections was for political purposes.
The Western Australian Liberal Party and the soon to be retired Western Australian Police Commissioner Dr Karl Joseph O'Callahan and other senior police were for obvious reasons needing to make a public announcement that the Western Australian Liberal Party Government and the current Western Australian Police Commissioner Dr Karl Joseph O'Callahan and the Western Australian Police Service had arrested the Claremont Serial Killer.
If it turns out that the evidence does not support the public claim by the Western Australian Police Service that Bradley Robert Edwards is solely responsible for the Abductions and Murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, then there would be massive damages claim by Bradley Robert Edwards for false arrest and cause unrepairable damage to the international reputation of the Western Australian Police Service and the retiring Western Australian Police Commissioner Dr Karl Joseph O'Callahan.



Other interesting information that has come up on Internet Discussion Forums about the Claremont Serial Killings and the arrest of Bradley Robert Edwards

There are claims made on the Internet discussion forums that the legal fees to represent Bradley Robert Edwards are being paid by the Aboriginal Legal Service.

There is a claim that the woman's silk dressing gown found relating to  the indecent assault of an 18-year-old woman during a home invasion in 1988, is just a ruse by the Western Australian Police, and has no real evidential relationship in proving that Bradley Robwert Edwards was the person solely responsible for the abductions and murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon



evidential relationship



 

Detective Sergeant John Callegari Holds a the Silken Dressing Gown for Rod Taylor to take a picture for the West Australian Newspaper in 1988,
which was claimed to be fouund in the house  
 relating to  the indecent assault of an 18-year-old woman during a home invasion in 1988





A man accused over the two Claremont serial killings case had led a quiet life 

Bradley Edwards, 48, was known as a friendly father in Kewdale, south of Perth

From 2000, he spent a lot of his time volunteering at local Little Athletics Club

Family friend said she was shocked the father was arrested for cold case murder

Edwards was charged with the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon

By Cindy Tran for Daily Mail Australia



 



Bradley Robert Edwards was praised for his hard work at Little Athletics -

a local club where his stepdaughter competed  (pictured shaking hands with former WA Labor leader Eric Ripper in 2013)

Man charged with Claremont serial murders looking relaxed as he coaches children at little athletics -

 three years before police DNA breakthrough that led to his arrest 

    A man accused over the two Claremont serial killings case had led a quiet life 

    Bradley Edwards, 48, was known as a friendly father in Kewdale, south of Perth

    From 2000, he spent a lot of his time volunteering at local Little Athletics Club

    Family friend said she was shocked the father was arrested for cold case murder

    Edwards was charged with the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon

    By Cindy Tran for Daily Mail Australia

  • A man accused over the two Claremont serial killings case had led a quiet life 
  • Bradley Edwards, 48, was known as a friendly father in Kewdale, south of Perth
  • From 2000, he spent a lot of his time volunteering at local Little Athletics Club
  • Family friend said she was shocked the father was arrested for cold case murder
  • Edwards was charged with the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4082970/Bradley-Robert-Edwards-life-charged-Claremont-serial-killings-case.html#ixzz4nCzZdFX2 
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook



A man accused over the two Claremont serial killings case had led a quiet suburban life as a devoted stepfather who volunteered at a children's sports club.

Pictures of Bradley Robert Edwards looking relaxed during his time as a volunteer timekeeper at Little Athletics in 2013 have emerged just weeks after he was charged.

The 48-year-old who was well known to the community lived in the humble four-bedroom home in Kewdale, south of Perth, since 2000 with his French wife.

He joined the athletics club to help out while his daughter was a member, but stayed to help out even after she outgrew it. 

A family friend has spoken of her shock after learning the friendly father figure was arrested over the cold case murders just days before Christmas.

'Brad was always very nice and friendly, and my family were taken by shock when we found out about what he [is alleged to] have done to those poor women,' she told Woman's Day.

'Anyone who knows him wouldn't say a bad word about him.'

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4082970/Bradley-Robert-Edwards-life-charged-Claremont-serial-killings-case.html

 

Edwards is believed to have been residing with his stepdaughter since his marriage to his French wife, Catherine Marie Geneste, broke down in 2015. 

Detectives alleged recent DNA tests on a kimono found nearly 30 years ago matched samples found on the body of the third victim Ciara Glennon.

They also matched samples from a 17-year-old girl who was abducted in Claremont in 1995 before she was allegedly sexually assaulted in the Karrakatta cemetery.

 

Secretary Sarah Spiers, 18, was the first of three victims who was last seen at a Claremont nightclub after celebrating Australia Day with friends in 1996.

Her body has never been found as police continue inquiries into her death.

In the same year, childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, went missing after she was last seen outside the Continental Hotel in June 1996.

Her body was found in bushland in August 1996.


In March 1997, Ciara Glennon, a 27-year-old lawyer, disappeared after leaving Continental Hotel. Her body was found in bushland at Eglington, in Perth's north, on April 3.

Mr Edwards has since been charged with eight offences, including the alleged murders of Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon.

He has also been charged with the rape of the 17-year-old girl and the indecent assault of an 18-year-old woman during a home invasion in 1988.

However, no charges have been laid over the disappearance of Ms Spiers. 

Mr Edwards has been remanded in custody.












What happened to Jane Rimmer from 12.30 am on Sunday the 9th of June, 1996 onwards ...
and
why did the Western Australian Police and the media deliberately lie
to the Western Australian Public for 20 years about the last sighting of Jane Rimmer,
which was at around 12.30 am on Sunday the 9th of June, 1996 hitchhiking on Stirling Highway near Loch Street, Claremont, Western Australia...
was it because as witnesses have stated according to USA media investigators, that some members of the Western Australian polie Service were involved in picking up Jane Rimmer on Sunday Morning on Stirling Highway ... and these police officers have not come forward to say what they did with Jane Rimmer after they picked up Jane Rimmer on Sunday Morning on Stirtl#ing Highway ....  

Jane Rimmer was 23 when she went missing in 1996 after a night out in Claremont
Jane Rimmer above

after the four twenty-one year old uni students saw Jane Rimmer Hitchhiking on Stirling Highway
near Lock Street at around 12.30 am staggering as though she was quite drunk.
TheyweregoingtopickupJaneRimmerbutforsomereasondidnotpickupJaneRimmer
even though they commented to each other
that it  was a dangerous place to be hitchhicking at that hour of the morning

Below is the false statement that the police and all the Western Australian media
have stated to the public for the last 20 years about the last sighting of Jane Rimmer at 4 minutes past midnight on Sunday June 9th 1996 

Sunday June 9, 1996: Childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, was last seen leaving Claremont’s Continental Hotel at 00.04am after a Saturday night out with friends. She was last seen standing outside Club Bay View after she declined a lift home with friends, with whom she had been drinking. Her parents had expected their bubbly daughter for lunch that Sunday at their Wembley home.

However,  the true last sighting of Jane Rimmer was at around 12.30 am hitchhiking on Stirling Highway near Loch Street,Claremont,
which is going towards Perth from where Jane Rimmer had been at the Continental Hotel in Bay View Terrace

The corner of Loch Street and Stirling Highway from the
Continental Hotel in Bay View Terrace is only about 10 to 15 minutes walk.
The Uni Students   were driving back to near the Nedlands Uni after attending a 21st birday party at the Claremont Yatch Club,
which is near the bottom of Bay View Terrace, Claremont.
They would have drived up Bay View Terrace andf turned right on the Stirling Highway,
towards Nedlands w
here  they lived near the university of Western Australia
So Jane Rimmer was hitchhiking towards Nedlands/Perth on the left side of the road if one was driving to Perth



Continental Hotel

Bay View  Terrace, Claremont


http://www.websleuths.com/forums/showthread.php?294704-Claremont-Serial-Killer-Media-Timelines-Photos-*NO-DISCUSSION*/page10
Title: We Saw Jane Rimmer Hitchhiking - Student
Author:Andrew Clennell
Date: 19 June 1996
Publisher: Community Times, News Chronical, Nedlands Edition.

Title: We Saw Jane Rimmer Hitching - Uni Student says
Author: Andrew Clennell Date: 19th June, 1996
Publisher: Community Times, News Chronical, Nedlands Edition

University student Emma Clayton and her friends almost picked up a blonde girl she is sure was Jane Rimmer early on the Sunday Morning Jane Rimmer disapeared.
Miss Clayton (21 years old uni student) said she saw the girl staggering along Stirling Highway, thumb out, hitching a lift at 12.30 am. Emma Clayton told police about the incident and her description of the cloths Jane was wearing matched that of a police description which had not been released to the media. Ms Clayton said she and her friends had been in Stirling Highway after leaving a 21st birthday party at Claremont Yacht Club. "Down near Lock Street we saw a girl Hitchhiking," she said. The Girl had her thumb out and we just slowed down and thought maybe we should pick her up but didn't." The conversation between the two couples in the car had been that she was a silly girl for trying to hitch in the area and they discussed whether they should pick the girl up. The decided at the last minute to move on. "we said of all placed for a girl to be hitchhiking alone, this was probably the worst," Miss Clayton said. She said initially, after she had heard of Jane Rimmer's disappearance, she felt guilty that that hadn't picked her up. "If we had picked her up things would have been a lot different, " Miss Clayton said. When she and her friends saw the girl there were no other cars on the Stirling Highway ...




Western Australian Police and Liberal Government so not deny the accusations by USA media investigators of presenting  false evidence to the public and Australian media in the Claremont Serial Killings investigation to falsely arrest Bradley Edwards for the Claremont Serial Killings for the main purpose of using the arrest of Bradley Edwards to help win the March state election in Western Australia.
SEE
www.nyt.bz/missingmurdered_westaust

www.nyt.bz/claremontserialkillings

New book and film includes some of the information about the Claremont Serial Killings



A new book is being published and a film of the same name is being produced in Australia entitled " Missing Abducted Murdered In Western Australia"
which exposes those named by witness statements as being involved with the carrying out and organising the Claremont Serial Killings and other serious crimes committed in Western Australia and how and why the Western Australian Police and Liberal Government covered up the truth from being exposed and those involved protected from investigation and arrest and how they used their powerful connections in the Western Australian media to help present false and misleading information about the Claremont Serial Killings and other serious crimes committed in Western Australia
Western Australian Police issued a false statement to the media that a group of boys saw Ciara Glennon stop and lean over to talk to people or a person in a Holden Station Wagon when one of the boys have stated that all they saw was the back lights of a car and did not in anyway see Ciara Glennon or any girl leaning over with her hands on her knees talking to a person or people in any car on the Stirling Highway, Claremont.
The Western Australian Police Service helped by their powerful connections in the Western Australian media have for 20 odd years presented a false impression to the Western Australian public that the last time Jane Rimmer was seen alive was at around midnight outside the Continental Hotel in Claremont, when it was well known by the Western Australian Police and the Western Australian media and the Western Australian Liberal Government that the last known sighting of Jane Rimmer was by four 21 year old university students was at around 12.30 am when Jane Rimmer was hitchhiking on Stirling Highway near Loch Street and was staggering and looking quite drunk.
The university students told the Western Australian Police about seeing Jane Rimmer hitchhiking on Stirling Highway near Loch Street at around 12.30 am the mornings Jane Rimmer disappeared and this sighting of Jane Rimmer was publicly reported in a community newspaper thus the other main media outlets in Western Australia would have also known about the university students reporting their sighting of Jane Rimmer hitchhiking on Stirling Highway near Loch Street at around 12.30 am the morning Jane Rimmer disappeared and eventually murdered with her body bring found in bushland.
There is evidence presented to USA media investigators that shows involvement of Western Australian Police and powerful well connected business people being involved with the Claremont Serial Killings and other serious crimes committed in Western Australia.
The Western Australian Police also failed to more closely look at and investigate the names and identities of the man and woman that traveled by taxi with Sarah Spiers to South Perth by taxi who the USA media investigators say were involved in picking up Sarah Spiers in a  taxi they already were in, when they convinced Sarah Spiers to get into their taxi  before the taxi Sarah Spiers had ordered that arrived only a few minutes later to find Sarah Spiers already gone.

www.nyt.bz/missingmurdered_westaust

www.nyt.bz/claremontserialkillings

 

100 Best Things to Do in Australia

Your RVF Lifestyle

RV Road Trip

RV-ing around the world

RV Road Trip

100 Best Things to Do in Australia

by J Rogers

https://www.your-rv-lifestyle.com/things-to-do-in-australia/

 

Australia has a wide variety of landscapes, ranging from mountain ranges in the south-eastern and western sections, tropical rainforests in the north-east quarter, with arid and semi-arid desert in the middle. It is the sixth largest nation in the world. The capital city is Canberra.

The country has an extremely diverse way of life and is equally famous for the beautiful beaches, as it is for the rugged outback. Most visitors simply do not realise just how vast the country is!

Each state has different things to offer the tourist. Victoria is widely recognised as the cultural capital, and it is here that you will find the best food and wine. Queensland is mostly tropical, while New South Wales has magnificent beaches. Tasmania is cooler, while the western and northern territories are rugged. Capital Territory prides itself on culture, with many galleries and museums to explore.

1. The Great Barrier Reef

This is located off the coast of Queensland, and is the largest coral reef in the world. It is a huge tourist destination, with cruises and diving boats which offer special expeditions to the reef.
Diving gear is normally available to hire, when you have produced diving documentation, so be sure to take it all with you.
Make sure you book any tours in advance as they are a very popular way to see the reef.

2. Sydney Harbour Bridge

You may also hear of the bridge as ‘the Coathanger’ because of the arch shape. The bridge spans the harbour and carries vehicles, trains, bicycles and foot passengers between the central business district and the North Shore.
The bridge is an iconic feature of the harbour, it was built in 1932 and is the sixth longest spanning bridge in the world. It also ranks as the tallest arch bridge, being 44-feet from the water level to the top.
Plan on spending a day in the area, and make sure you have your camera with you.

3. Uluru

You may have also heard of this as Ayers Rock, which is the more well-known name. It is a huge sandstone rock which can be found in the Northern Territory, 335 km west of Alice Springs.
The rock is sacred to the aboriginal people of the area. The Anangu people often lead walking tours of the rock and surrounding area, and are very informative about the fauna and flora there.
If possible, try to visit at dawn or sunset when the colours are at their most spectacular.
Allow a half day or more, depending on how much exploring you want to do.

4. Sydney Opera House

This ranks as one of the most distinctive and famous of buildings to have been built in the 20th century. It was opened in 1973.
The complex covers the entire Bennelong Point on the harbour, you simply cannot miss it!
There are different venues in the complex, with over 1,500 shows each year. There are three resident companies there, namely Opera Sydney, Sydney Theatre Company, and Sydney Symphony Orchestra.
If you plan to see any show here, you must book in advance. Should you want to stay the night, you will find plenty of hotels in the area.

5. Port Jackson

This is an area, rather than a specific thing. It is where the waters of Sydney Harbour, Middle Harbour, North Harbour, Parramatta River, and Lan Cove all meet. Significantly, it is the spot where the first European settlement in the country took place.
You will remember some events which take place there, namely the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.
The harbour is also famous for the New Year’s Eve firework display.
Spend a full day looking around the area, there are many places where you can get lunch during the day.

6. Cable Beach

This magnificent beach is 6 km west of Broome, and is a 22 km stretch of beautiful white sands.
The waves are very gentle during the season from May to October. After that, there is an influx of jellyfish, so swimming is not advisable.
Take a camel ride along the beach at sunset and sunrise, and look out for the ‘clothing optional’ area, if this appeals to you.
If you head for the southern part of the beach you will find Gantheaume Point where you may be lucky to see whales and dolphins as they migrate.

7. Visit Uluru

This is the heart of the outback and well worth a visit. You will find out how the residents managed with the Royal Flying Doctor Service as their only medical help, and how they coped with fearsome desert creatures.
Be sure to check out the Reptile Park, where you will see some of them!
If you like, you can head out into the West Mac Donnell Range and hike to the top of Anzac Hill.
Make sure you stop at the historic Overland Telegraph Station, which was built in 1872 and was the first communication outpost in the area.

8. Eureka Tower

You will find this skyscraper in the Southbank area of Melbourne. It is the highest public vantage point in any building in the southern hemisphere, measuring 935 feet. The observation deck is on level 88.
This is the second tallest building in the country, and still the tallest to the roof.
On the observation deck you will find 30 viewfinders so you can check out the whole of Melbourne. There are also free binoculars which you can use. If you are brave enough, head for the small outside area called ‘The Terrace’, which fortunately is protected from the winds.
Especially for the brave, try the glass cube called ‘The Edge’, which is a glass box hanging over the edge of the tower, only adding to the experience of height!

9. Great Ocean Road

If you visit Australia, then this should be on your list of things to do! The road runs between Torquay and Allansford, for 243 km along the south-eastern coast.
The road itself is a memorial dedicated to soldiers killed during WWI, and winds over different terrain along the coast. There are several landmarks you will pass along the way such as the Twelve Apostles rock formations.
Warrnambool is the largest city along the route, so you should stop here for supplies if you need them. The road is two lanes, one in each direction, and the speed limit changes, so be aware of this and watch for the road signs.

10. The Shrine of Remembrance

This dedication is found in Melbourne. It was constructed in dedication to those who served in WWI, although bow it is a memorial to all Australians who served in wars.
The shrine is constructed of Tynong granite, containing the marble Stone of Remembrance.
Be sure to check out the engraved words ‘Greater love hath no man’. Of significance here is that once a year, on 11th November at 11am (Remembrance Day), the sun shines through the roof and lights up the word ‘love’.
Look for the crypt below which has a bronze statue of a soldier and his young son. The panels list each unit of the Australian Imperial Force.
Plan to spend a half day here, although longer if you are searching for a name on the panels.

11. Mount Kosciuszko

This mountain is part of the Australian Alps national Parks and reserves, and you will find it on the main range of the Snowy Mountains, in New South Wales.
At 2,228 m above sea level, it is the highest mountain in the country.
You will many outdoor activities here such skiing and snowboarding in the winter months, and great walking in the summertime. There are many trails for mountain biking and bushwacking. You can rent mountain bikes at some of the trails.
This is a great area to take an RV and spend a few days.

12. The Twelve Apostles

You will find this outcrop off the shore of Port Campbell National Park. It is also visible from the Great Ocean Road. This is a very popular tourist attraction.
Originally there were 12 outcrops, but over time, some have eroded and collapsed. Right now, there are only eight, as one collapsed in 2005.
The remaining outcrops are over 50 metres high. Hikers and walkers will enjoy the many trails in the area, and this is a good place to take an RV for a few days. Be aware that you must take all your provisions as there may not be anywhere to stock up on.

13. Darling Harbour

You will find this harbour in Sydney near to the city centre. It is also well-known as a recreational area, with a pedestrian precinct.
There are many attractions to be seen in the area, such as the Chinese Garden of friendship, and the Powerhouse Museum.
Madame Tussauds is there, as is the Sydney Aquarium, so it is a good idea to spend a full day here. Perhaps even book into a hotel and stay longer.

14. Queen Victoria Market

You may also hear this called the ‘Queen Vic’. It is a very well-known landmark, and the largest open-air market in the southern hemisphere. You will find it in Melbourne.
The market has been going strong since the 19th century. There used to be three markets, but the other two closed, leaving the Queen Victoria market as the oldest surviving market.
This is a very popular market, where you can find almost everything you want. It is now part of the Victorian Heritage register. If you plan to spend a full day there, you will not be disappointed.

15. K’gari (Fraser Island)

The whole island is heritage-listed, and you will find it on the south coast. It is the largest sand island in the world, with a variety of microclimates such as sand dunes, lakes, and rainforests.
The island is Queensland’s largest, as well as Australia’s 6th largest island. It is populated by only a handful of people, because tourists go there to walk and hike, before returning to the mainland.
Expect to see an abundance of plants, and a diverse range of animals including the saltwater crocodile!

Plan a day hiking or walking here, and be on the lookout for reptiles and mammals.

16. The Snowy Mountains

These are also known as ‘The Snowies’. They are the highest mountain range in the country. It is here you will find the highest mountain namely Mount Kosciuszko. There are also another five peaks above 2,100 metres high.
Look out for the ‘Mountain Plum Pine’ which is thought to be the world’s oldest living plant, it is a type of conifer.
In winter, the area is very popular with skiers and snowboarders, while in the warmer months, hiking and rambling takes precedent.
Allow yourself plenty of time to explore the area, in the warmer months it is a great place to take an RV for a few days.

17. Kata Tjuta

You will find these amazing rock formations 365 miles southwest of Alice Springs. You may also hear it called ‘The Olgas’. You will know it by the large group of domed formations.
The highest dome is Mount Olga, which is 1,066 metres above sea level.
If you enjoy hiking and walking, then this is a good place to head for. There is also coming in the area, so plan to spend a few days here and explore.

18. Melbourne Aquarium

This is no ordinary aquarium! Not only can you look at sharks – you can dive with them! Grey Nurses, Whaler Sharks, and Seven Kill Sharks, all make up the inhabitants of this complex.
You will take to the water with a fully qualified dive instructor who will ensure that your dive is not only safe but enjoyable.
You do not need any diving experience – a sense of adventure is all that is needed!
You must book your tickets in advance, and the best way to do this is online.

19. Burleigh Heads

This interesting suburb is found in the city of Gold Coast. This is very popular with surfers, and you will find the beaches a great place to barbeque and play a few cricket matches.
On Sundays the town centre is filled with buskers, and local musicians, along with fire-twirlers to keep the kids amused.
In the high street you will find an assortment of delis, cafes, and interesting shops, so it is worth spending a full day here and enjoying the atmosphere.

20. Bay of Fires

The name was given to the bay by Captain Tobias Furneaux in 1773, when he saw the fires of the Aboriginal people on the beach.
You will find that the beaches are wonderfully white, the water incredibly blue, and the outcrops an amazing colour of orange shades.
The northern area is national park, while the southern part is conservation area.
In and around the Bay of Fires there are many outdoor activities for families, such as boating, swimming, and fishing. It is also a great place for bird watching.
There is a campsite, so you can pitch a tent or take an RV and spend some time in this lovely area.

21. Dandenong

This is an area, rather than a single place. It is a suburb of Melbourne, about 30km southeast of the centre.
What makes this unique is the diverse population who live here. It is therefore, a great place to sample different types of cuisine, which will have influences such as Turkish and Albanian.
There are many eclectic shops and literally dozens of interesting restaurants, so plan to spend a full day here.

22. Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary

You will find the sanctuary in Brisbane. This sanctuary not only takes care of Koalas, but also kangaroos, wombats, and Tasmanian devils. It is the largest and oldest koala sanctuary in the world.
If you have children, then try to visit here as you get to hold the koalas! They are not allowed to be held for more than 30 minutes per day. You can also help with feeding the kangaroos.
Once a day there is an exhibition of the birds of prey, showing off their speed and incredible eyesight.
There is also a small farm where you may see sheep dog shows, so you should plan to spend the full day here to see everything!

23. Stradbroke Island

The easiest way to visit this island is to take a tour which leaves from Brisbane. The island has over 100 fresh water lakes, which you can visit. The lakes are safe to swim, or just to walk along.

Watch out for dolphins, manta rays, turtles, and even whales as you cross the water. You may also see kangaroos and koalas on the island.

There are small towns where you can buy lunch, although this is often included on trips.
If you want to stay longer, there is an excellent hotel on the island.

24. Hervey Bay Whale Watching

The best way to see whales is to take a whale watch tour, and you will find these readily available in Hervey Bay. Most of the tours last about 4 hours, and often the vessels have underwater viewing windows.
Often the tour will include your lunch and afternoon tea, so they are really good value for money. Many of them will collect you at your hotel and drop you back there. You will be able to book tickets for tours at your hotel.
Look out for Humpbacks on their annual migration. Note that the tours are seasonal, so check to make sure they are running, don’t assume they are.

25. Tully and Barron River

If you enjoy water sports, then make sure you head here for some water rafting, and rapid riding. You will need to go with a group of like-minded people, and the adventure will take about five hours.
The river rafting tours are suitable for kids as well as adults and carry on all year round. Both rivers offer rafting opportunities, with no previous experience being needed. All training is given on the day by professional rafters.
Allow yourself a full day here, and make sure you bring dry, warm clothing for when you are done.

26. Kurunda Scenic Railway

This railway runs from Cairns to Kurunda, and snakes its way through the Macalister mountain range. It used to be used as a regular commuter train, but it is not only used for tourists. It operates daily apart from Christmas day.
The journey will take about 2 hours and will pass through the most beautiful terrain, on the climb to the falls. The tropical gardens are a delight to see and a very well-known attraction.
You will get the opportunity for photos as the train stops at a lookout, where you can see Barron Falls. Look out for Stoney Creek Falls as you pass, as they are just a few metres from the train.
Near the station you will find a zoo where you can feed kangaroos and hold the koalas. There is also an information centre and a gift shop.
Allow yourself a full day for this, as you can then spend some time in the town.

27. Queenstown Winery Tour

This half day tour is available in Queenstown, and it is a great idea to take advantage of it. You will get to see three different wineries, as well as take a tour of an underground wine cave.
The tours normally start in the afternoon, and for an extra fee you can visit a craft beer tasting centre.
Each vineyard will select some wines to sample along with snacks, so you will not go hungry!
The guides are normally very knowledgeable about the wines you taste, having a passion for wine themselves, so you will be well cared for.
These tours are not suitable for children.

28. Phillip Island

This island is found about 140 km south-east of Melbourne. It was named after the first governor of New South Wales. The island forms a natural breakwater for the shallow waters in Western Port.
The island is connected to the mainland by a bridge, which was originally made of wood. The population of the island is about 10,000, although in the summer it increases to 40,000. Most of the island is for grazing cattle and sheep.
If you enjoy wildlife, this will delight you. The island has a significant population of penguins and pacific gulls. You may also see wallabies and kangaroos, who are tame enough to be fed.
Make sure you head to the western side as this is where you will find the largest colony of seals in Australia.
Plan on spending a full day here and enjoy the amazing wildlife!

29. Take a Wild Tour

These tours are a great way to see wildlife. They leave from many Melbourne hotels, and are normally in small groups.

Most of them include a picnic lunch. You will take a guided walk through the bush, and visit the wildlife sanctuary, which has koalas in their natural environment. Look out for tribes of emus, and flocks of cockatoos.

The tour company will arrange pick-up and drop off from your hotel, making this is a very easy way to see the natural side of the country

30. Nitmiluk National Park

This national park is 244 km southeast of Darwin. There are a series of gorges which are accessible by flat bottomed boat or canoe.
In the dry season, the water level is lower, so the gorges do not run into each other, but in the rainy season you can explore them together.
You will find a visitor centre at Katherine Gorge which is about 30 km east of the town of Katherine. There you will find maps that explain the layout of the gorges, and the landscape. Tours are available to book here, if you prefer.
This is a great place to spend a few days, you will find two permanent campsites for both tents and RV’s.

31. Lord Howe Island

You will find this small island in the Tasman Sea. It is east of Port Macquarie. It has a very diverse terrain, but is best known for the beautiful, sandy beaches.
You will also find subtropical forests here with clear streams. There are many trails, but the best one is the trail that winds up Mount Gower, where you will have the most amazing views!
Look out for seabird colonies, which include Masked Boobies. If you enjoy scuba diving or snorkeling, then be sure to take your equipment with you as you can do this on Admiralty Island, which is nearby.

32. Royal Botanical Gardens

These gardens are in Melbourne and were founded in 1846. The garden extends to the river, with trees, landscaped gardens, and lakes. You will find over 50,000 different plants here from 8,500 species.
Look out for the algae and fungi collections which are one of the most comprehensive in Australia.
There is a café where you can get lunch, so plan to spend most of the day here, and enjoy the gardens.

33. Blue Mountains

The name comes from the natural blue haze which is created by the eucalyptus forests in the area. You can get to the Blue Mountains from Katoomba by train, as it only takes about two hours.

The whole area is filled on interesting things you can do, such as take the glass-floored cable car to the top of a peak.

There is an Aboriginal tour which will take you through the Blue Mountains, and this departs from Faulconbridge Train Station.

If you enjoy hiking, then you will love the many trails which take you to secret waterfalls and valleys.

Rock climbing is very popular, and you will also see abseiling.

This is a great place to take an RV, spend a few days, and get to know the area.

34. Margaret River Distillery Tour

The best way to visit this area is to join a tour. These leave from the main car park at the Margaret River Centre, and you will visit four delightful distilleries through the day.

The area is famous for beer, wine, and gin, and you will be plied with interesting cocktails through the day.

Lunch is included in these tours, making them very good value for money. These are not recommended for children.

35. Hobart

This is the capital of Tasmania, and the second oldest city in the country. You will find it on the south-east side of Tasmania.

Hobart was founded in 1804 as a penal colony, and you will find the city steeped in history. One of the best ways to see the city is to take a guided tour. These are available three times a day and for different lengths of time. The River Derwent runs through the town, and there are many small cafes along the front.

Close by you will find Battery Point which is an historic district. Look out for the Colonial cottages.

In the distance you can see Mount Wellington, which is 1,270 metres high and has plenty of hiking and cycling trails.

Make sure you check online for upcoming events and plan a night in the city.

It is well worth spending a few days here. There are many hotels in all price ranges.

36. Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary

This is regarded as the best wildlife park on the Gold Coast. You will find it in Currumbin. It also has the cheapest entry tickets!
Make sure you visit the wildlife hospital where you can see animals who are recovering from injury and illness. You may see kangaroos, crocodiles, and many others.
You can hand feed some of the animals, and also stay for feeding time at the Rainbow Lorikeet house.
Make sure you get your photo taken with a cuddly Koala bear!

37. Daintree Rainforest

You will find this rainforest in the north-east section of Queensland. It covers 1,200 square km, making it the largest tropical rainforest in the country. In fact, the rainforest grows right down to the coast, and the edge of the sea.
If you enjoy hiking, camping, walking, and investigating flora of all sorts, then make sure you head here. Accommodation is available in the way of camping, glamping, or in the luxury eco resort.
This is one of the oldest rainforests left in the world, so you should not miss the opportunity to see it.

38. Lake Eyre

This is also known as Kati Thanda, and is the lowest natural point in the country, being at 15 metres below sea level. When the lake fills it becomes the largest lake in Australia.
An interesting point here is that when the lake fills, it is as salty as the sea, although when it dries up, the water evaporates, and the saltiness is increased.
The lake was named after John Edward Eyre, the first European to set eyes on it, back in 1840.
This is a good place to bring an RV, you can hike around in the day, and barbeque in the evenings.

39. Salamanca Market

You will find this street market in Hobart. The market days are held on Saturdays, although in January and February, the are also held on Sundays.
Whatever you want, you are most likely to find here, with over 300 stallholders, selling things from gourmet produce to arts and crafts.
In the immediate vicinity, you will find hotels, bars, and restaurants, so it is worth spending a night or two here when the market is on.

40. Bungy Jumping and Minjin Swing

This is for those who like adventures while they travel. You will find these right outside Cairns. The bungy Tower offers two of the best adrenaline rushes you could ask for, in the same location.
The bungy jump has over 16 different jump styles to choose from, while the swing allows you to pair up with a friend for the ride of your life.
The views, of course, are spectacular- if you have your eyes open!

41.The Three Sisters

This is a very unusual rock formation in the Blue Mountains. They are close to the town of Katoomba.
Legend has it that three sisters from one village fell in love with three men from another village. They were forbidden, by law to marry. The men planned to capture the women and run off with them, and a tribal battle began. The sisters were turned into stone by an elder, who was then killed before he could turn them back.
Whatever you believe, it is a spectacular spot to visit, with great hiking and amazing views!

42. The Giant Stairway

This is not too far from Katoomba. It is a bushwacking trail which will lead you to the Three Sisters, and further down to the floor of the Valley. To each the floor you will need to use the steps – 800 of them!
The trail will take you about an hour and a half, with great views along the way.
If you do not feel you can negotiate the steps, you can also reach the floor of the Valley by train which leaves from Katoomba.

43. City of Perth

The city of Perth is found next to the Swan River, and is one of the most isolated capital cities in the world. You will find that it is near to the Australian bushland, which gives the city an ‘outdoor’ feel.
Perth is full of interesting things to see and do. You may visit the Pinnacle’s Deserts limestone pillars, or take a trip to the Margaret River wine region.
In the southern parts you will find forests with formidable trees.
It is worth booking into a hotel for a few nights, and exploring the area.

44. Cairns Wildlife Dome

This is an all-weather wildlife exhibit which you will find on top of the iconic Reef Hotel Casino.
This is one of the leading zoos in the country, and is enclosed in a 20-metre high glass dome. You will find birds, pythons, turtles, and crocodiles, to name a few of the animals there.
You can buy a ticket which will last you for four days, so you can take your time and see all there is to see. This is an excellent way to see the zoo, and all the animals.

45. Bondi Beach

You will find this very popular beach about 7km east of Sydney. It is one of the most visited beaches in the country. You may know of some of the competitions which are held here every year.
The area hosts the National Rugby League, as well as the City to Surf run, which happens every year in August. This is a fun run, attracting over 60,000 entrants.
You may be there when the Flickerfest takes place in January. This is an international short film festival.
There is a beach market which takes place every Sunday, and a food market at Christmas.
If you are staying in the area, then you will see many families spending Christmas Day on the beach.

46. Brisbane River

This river flows through Brisbane, and is the longest river in Queensland. The river starts at Mount Stanley and has been dammed to form lakes along the way.
You may remember that the largest ship to be built on the river was the Robert Miller. You might be lucky and see bull sharks, which appear from time to time.
If you fish, they you may catch lungfish and river cod. There are 16 bridges that cross the river, and the Clem Jones Tunnel is the first underground crossing for transport.
Plan to spend a full day in the area so that you can grab a bite along the river, and explore the surroundings.

47. Nambung National Park

You will find this park in western Australia, 17 km south of the town of Cervantes. In the park, you will find the Pinnacles Desert which has the most amazing limestone formations.
You will also find beaches here at Kangaroo Point, and Hangover Bay, with beautiful coastal dunes and flowering plants.
If you head for the northern part of the park, there is a boardwalk which lets you see thrombolites, which are over 3 million years old.
Allow yourself a full day here, and take a packed lunch if you do, as well as water.

48. Melbourne Cricket Ground

This sports venue is found in Yarra Park, Melbourne. It is home to the Melbourne Cricket Club, and the 10th largest stadium in the world. It has the tallest light towers of any sporting venue in the world.
You can walk to the complex from the city centre. One of the most popular events is the annual Boxing Day Test, although many other events are hosted through the year.
If you plan to see any event, you must book in advance to avoid disappointment.

49. Skydive over Byron Bay

If you have never done a skydive before, then this is the place to try it! Not only is the scenery magnificent, but you get 60 seconds to look at it while you are in freefall. It is a great idea to have a video of the skydive, this is so different from regular holiday photos!
If you are not jumping, you can watch your friend land, this may make you change your mind!
You must book this in advance as they get extremely popular especially around Mother’s Day, ot public holidays.

50. Lone Pine Sanctuary

This is the world’s largest Koala sanctuary in the world, and it is one of Brisbane’s most popular tourist attraction. There are over 130 Koalas who live there.
This is a fund day out for the family, you get to cuddly the Koalas anytime you like, and feed the kangaroos.
Another animal you will see is the rare Platypus. There are shows that take place through the day, and great entertainment for all ages. You should plan to spend the entire day here.

51. Kings Cross Farmhouse Restaurant

This is one place you should try, if you are in Melbourne. It’s a local restaurant who uses locally sourced products.
Try the trout or the Blue Crab, and you will not be disappointed. Mind you, the dessert menu is also fantastic!
The restaurant has a very impressive wine and beer menu, and the staff make it a great place for a delightful evening meal. You must book your table as it gets very full.

52. Royal Botanic Garden

This garden is found in the middle of Sydney. It opened in 1816, and is still the oldest botanical garden in the country.
The garden is open every day of the year, and better still – it is free to enter. The stunning views of the harbour and the opera house make it a delightful venue to spend an afternoon.
The gardens are formed into an amphitheatre and are divided into four different areas, namely Lower Gardens, Middle Gardens, Palace Gardens, and the Bennelong section. In each section, you will find smaller gardens, with a café area in the middle of this layout. At the café you will find a visitor’s centre and a bookshop.
It is worth spending a full day here, certainly you will want to do this if you are interested in gardening.

53. Cape Tribulation

You will find this headland in Queensland, in the Shire of Douglas. Back in the mid 80’s the population was around 300, with the area being mostly popular with hikers.
Since then hostels and resorts have been built to cater for tourists. There is accommodation to suit all budgets.
The best time to visit is between July and November, when swimming is the best, with no stingers in the water.
If you plan to stay, then be sure to book your accommodation in advance.

54. Tjapukai Aboriginal Cultural Park

If you want to see and learn about the incredible traditions of the Aboriginal people, then this is a ‘must’. The park lies between cairns and Palm Cove. Spend a whole evening here, and enjoy the traditional music and dance routine.
There is an art gallery where you can see interesting pieces. After that you will be able to sample a selection of native spiced canapes, before you attend a face painting session!
There is a dance ceremony and a fire-making ceremony, with dinner served at a relaxed pace.
You will be served traditional food, prepared by Tjapukai chefs. You may get to taste kangaroo burgers, or grilled mackerel.
The entire evening lasts only from 7-9.30, so it is not a late night, but well worth seeing!

55. The Rocks

This is an area, rather than a thing. It is a tourist area in the historic section of Sydney. It was the site of the first European settlement in the country, in 1788.
You will find wonderful views of the harbour bridge, as well as many historic buildings.
Be sure to check out the two oldest pubs in Sydney, namely the Fortune of War, and the Lord Nelson. There are many other pubs close by, and many interesting restaurants, art and gift shops.
Be sure to explore the colourful history of this area.

Try to make time to see Susannah Place Museum while you are there. It is a good idea to spend a full day here, as there is plenty to see and do.

56. Fish at the Rocks Restaurant

If you enjoy seafood, then you need to head here to taste some delicious seafood dishes. You will find the restaurant in Sydney.
Try the oysters and calamari for starters, and maybe the linguini for the main course.
If you are a dessert lover then be sure to ask for the apple and rhubarb crumble, which is truly delicious!
If you cannot make up your mind for a choice of wine, the staff will bring you a sample of each!

57. Snorkelling around Green Island

If you enjoy seeing life under the water, then treat yourself to a trip here. Leaving from cairns, you will head for the very popular Green Island, in a glass-bottomed boat.
After you have snorkeled to your heart’s content, be sure to check out the island, as it is a nature lover’s paradise! There is a self-guided tour you can take around the island, stopping for a dip in the island swimming pool, if you like.
Other things you may enjoy are parasailing or helicopter rides. You will find a well-informed visitor centre, and a café where you can get lunch, so you should plan to spend a full day here.

58. Salamanca Place

You will find this area in Hobart. What used to be warehouses, have now been transformed into beautiful restaurants, gift shops, galleries, and offices.
Enjoy visiting some of the local bars which you will find down at the wharf. The area is one of the most visited attractions here in the year.
While you are there, try to see the market, which is held on Saturdays.
If you are here after dark, you will find the area alive with music and people. There are many hotels in the area, so you could stay a day or two.
An interesting point here is that Salamanca Place is found on the Australian game of Monopoly.

59. Luna Park

If you have kids, then this is where you simply need to go! Even adults will thoroughly enjoy a day here! This amusement park is found in St Kilda, Melbourne. It was opened in 1912.
You will find the oldest operating roller coaster in the world here. It is one of only three where a brakeman stands in the middle of the train.
The park is filled with rides of all types, such as the Japanese built pirate ship, Twin Dragon, and the Holodeck, which is a motion simulator ride, to name a few.
Plan to spend the entire day here, the kids will not want to leave!

60. Penguin Island

The only way for you to get to this island is by boat, which you can arrange in Shoalwater. Camping is allowed on the island, for up to five days at a time.
You will be able to meet dolphins, over the side of the boat, and see them cajole about in the water right next to you.
The island has other interesting things to see such as birds and wildlife. The island is also very good for fishing and swimming, and a very pleasant way to get away and relax for a few days.
Be aware that there are no cafes on the island, so you need to carry all you need with you.

61. The Pub at Aussie World

You may be surprised to learn that this is one of the main attractions in Queensland, and is well deserving of a visit.
Aussie World is also the place for you to buy any special souvenirs from your visit, as it has a great gift store.
The Pub is open from 9am till late and has delicious lunch and dinner menus. They specialise in local produce and the feature of the day is often grilled steaks.
There is no better way to spend an afternoon relaxing with an ice cold beer.

You will also find a range of upmarket shops, and plenty of small cafes, making this is a good place to spend a full day.

62. Yarra River

You will find this is Victoria, and emptying into Hobsons’ Bay in Port Phillip. Originally the river was used for agriculture, and later mining, although now it is used for container shipping from Port of Melbourne.
For the public, the river means swimming, canoeing, kayaking, and rowing, and a good day out in the fresh air.
Try to visit at the annual Moomba Festival which is celebrated along the river.

63. Mount Coot-tha-Lookout

You will find this interesting place near Brisbane. It is a very popular spot for fantastic views of the greater Brisbane area.
There are buses which will take you up to the top, and bring you back down again, and there are places where you can get snacks and refreshments.
It will only take a half day to see this, but the views are worth it.

64. Wave Rock

This is one of Western Australia’s most spectacular and unique rock formations. The ‘wave’ is about 14 metres high and 110 metres long. It was formed millions of years ago. The formation is in the exact same shape as you would find in the ocean.
Pack yourself a picnic lunch, or join one of the many tours which go there, and enjoy exploring this amazing spot. There is an entrance fee at get close, although you will find it worth the amount. Remember to take a camera!

65. Legoland

This is in Melbourne. Regardless of whether you have children or not, this is a ‘must see’. There are 5 Lego play areas where the kids can get as creative as they like.
There is also a 4D cinema, and gift shop where you can pick up some of the latest additions to the Lego family.
There is a café, so you will have no excuse to leave early!

66. Whitsunday Islands

There are no less than 74 islands in this group! It is a very popular destination for tourists, and it is between Queensland and the Great Barrier Reef.
If you enjoy walking, then look for the trail called the Ngara Sea Trail Great walk. This is a combination of short walks, and sea ways, which cross some of the islands, namely South Molle, Hook, and Whitsunday.
You can camp at 8 areas on three of the islands, and this is great for sailing, powerboating, or kayaking.
There is varied accommodation available, to suit all budgets, so you may want to book a few nights and enjoy the area.

67. Jenolan Caves

You will find the caves in the Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. They are about 30 km west of Katoomba.
These are the oldest open caves in the world, and are well-known for their beauty. The caves are still being explored, although tourists have eleven caves to view.
To view these amazing caves will take you a half day, and then you may want to head into the town and have a look around there.

68. Valley of the Giants

You will find this forest of giants near Walpole, in the south-east part of the country. Be ready to be awed by their magnificence.
These giant red tingle trees grow to as high as 40 metres, and are unique to this area. There is a treetop walk which you should try, unless you are afraid of heights!
The walk will give you an idea of just how tall the trees are, and of course, the view from the top is amazing.
When you come down into the boardwalk below, you can follow the Ancient Empire Walk, which winds around the trees. Some of the trunks are up to 15 meters in circumference.
These are among the tallest trees in the world. There are other attractions here, such as a perfect swimming and picnic spot.
Be sure to look for the oldest eucalypt, which is not far from the giant Tingle Tree.

69. Kakadu National Park

You will find this 171 km southeast of Darwin. The park is enormous, covering an area of almost 200 km north to south, and over 100 km east to west. Put another way, it is half the size of Switzerland!
Here you will find some of the best examples of aboriginal rock art in the country. Look for the Nourlangie and Ubirr sites, where you will find the rocks.
If you are a bird watcher, then this will delight you, as over 30% of the country’s bird species can be found here.
You are very likely to see large saltwater crocodiles at Yellow Water, and East Alligator River, and you may be interested to know that this was where Crocodile Dundee was filmed. Make sure you take care around any crocs as they are dangerous.
You are welcome to fish in the park, but hunting is forbidden. You have the option of several places to stay, if you want to spend a few days here.

70. Taronga Zoo

This zoo has one of the finest collection of animals in the entire country. To get here, you need to take a ferry from Circular Quay, in Sydney Harbour. Often you can buy your ferry ticket zoo entrance together, which works out cheaper.
You will see the opera house from the water, which is spectacular! In the zoo, you will see zebras, kangaroos, and many other animals. The ticket includes a Sky Safari Cable Car ride, which lets you see the zoo from above.
Plan to stay the day, as you can buy lunch there, and take your time.

71.Whitehaven Beach

This beach is found along Whitsunday Island and can be reached by either boat, helicopter, or seaplane. The pure white sand is made of 98% silica, which gives it the amazing colour.
It is very popular with tourists as it makes the perfect place for a barbeque, and swimming.
There are camping facilities, so you can stay a few days and enjoy the outdoor life.

72. Port Arthur Historic Site

A good way to see this (as there is plenty to see) is to buy a two-day pass, which allows you to see things at your leisure. Some passes even include a Carnavon bay cruise, so look out for these.
There are over 30 historical buildings that you can visit, to learn about the colonial convict history. There is a museum, Interpretation gallery, and Dockyard, to mention just a few places.
There are plenty of hotels in all price ranges, making this is a good place to stay a few days.

73. Lake McKenzie

This is also called Boorangoora, and is found on Fraser Island, in the Great Sandy National Park.
Locals regard this as a wonderful family area, with pure white sands around the lake, and excellent picnic facilities, with even the toilets being of a high standard!
Allow yourself a full day here, pack a picnic and enjoy the area.

74. Yarra Valley

Yarra valley is the area which surrounds the Yarra River. So, while this is not one particular place, it is an area that you should try to explore.
There are many delightful towns in the region such as Woori Yallock, which is very popular with tourists.
If you enjoy walking, then you will find plenty of great trails to follow such as the Lilydale to Warburton Trail.
The area is well-known for wine growing, and there are numerous wineries that you can visit, and sample the wine, then perhaps buy a few bottles.

Make sure you check online for any upcoming events in the valley.

It is a good idea to take an RV around this area, and spend a few days exploring it.

75. The Ekka

This used to be called the Royal Queensland Show, and it is an agricultural show which is held annually at the Brisbane Showgrounds.
The show is Queensland’s largest annual event, so be prepared for it to be busy, as over 400,000 visitors arrive each year.
There are normally over 21,000 competition entrants in various events such as animals, and food sections.
Try to stay until nightfall, as there is always great entertainment well into the evenings.
The show is normally held over a week towards the end of August.

76. National Maritime Museum

This is a great place for people of all ages. The museum is found in Darling Harbour, Sydney.
There are many exhibits which are designed to be ‘hands-on’, so are perfect for kids of all ages. You can go aboard one of the famous vessels the dock at the harbour, so be sure to check when they are due.
There is a Mini Mariners Play Zone for the younger ones, and plenty of cinematic experiences where you can learn about the history of the Navy.
Allow yourself most of the day to see this, especially if there are interesting ships that have docked.

77. Kalbarri National Park

The park is situated 485 km north of Perth. The major tourist attraction is the Murchison Gorge, which runs for over 80 km down the lower part of the river.
The park is open all year round and is great for hiking and rambling. Winters are warm with moderate amounts of rain, while summers can get extremely hot, with temperatures often reaching above 40 degrees Celsius.
You must watch the rainfall if you want to hike in the park during the months of May through August as some roads to the gorge will be closed.

78. Tour Melbourne

Probably one of the best ways to explore Melbourne is to take a guided tour. This way you get to ask as many questions as you like, and your guide will answer them.
Most tours will take you through Sovereign Hill, which is a ‘frozen in time’ village from the 1800’s. You will be able to try your hand at panning for gold here.
Other things you may see include the Eureka Stockade, and Ballarat Wildlife Park, where you will be able to get lunch (included on most tours)
Allow yourself a full day here, whether you explore on your own, or take a tour, as there is plenty to see and do.

79. Cairns Cruise

If you do not snorkel or dive, and still want to see the Great Barrier Reef, then why not take a cruise?
Most cruise boats have glass bottoms to allow you to see the amazing sights below. You will find the tour guides very knowledgeable about the reef, and they will point out many interesting things and fish.
Snorkelers can get in the water when the boats stop. You will be served lunch on board, and maybe afternoon tea.

80. Tallebudgera Creek

If you enjoy outdoor activities, then this will appeal to you. You will find the creek in Burleigh Heads National Park. Kayaking is the most popular pastime here, although canoeing is also popular.
Walking and hiking through the area is a great experience, as there are many different plants and animals to see while you explore.
The beaches are lovely, and you can pack a picnic lunch while you relax on the warm sands.
Close by is the Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, where you can cuddle the Koalas, so it is worth planning a full day in the area.

81. Hot Air Balloon over Hinterland

If you want to see the landscape from a different angle, then try a hot air balloon flight. You can book this at Gold Coast Hinterland, and most flights last 30 minutes, although you can book longer ones if you like.
Balloon rides will take you over the rim of the Gold Coast, with the most spectacular views!
Be sure to check out their special birthday offers and champagne breakfasts.

This may not be the ride for you, if you are afraid of heights, but it is a great way to start the day!

82. Ningaloo Coast

This site is found in the western part of the country, along the East Indian Ocean. The Ningaloo Reef runs for 260 km along the coastline, and is the largest coral reef this close to the shore.
Walking is exceptional along the shoreline, and up on the cliffs, where you may catch sight of sharks. There are between 300 and 500 whale sharks who move through the waters.
Very close to the shoreline, you may see mangroves. There are estuaries and lagoons, as well as rocky shores, all worth exploring.
This is a great place to take an RV, spend a few days, and enjoy the area.

83. Circular Quay

You will find this harbour in Sydney, on the northern edge of the business centre. It is a very popular area for tourists, with many walkways, parks, and restaurants.
If you happen to be here at New Year, then this is where you will find people gather to watch the fireworks, and see the New Year in.
In the area you will also find the Museum of Contemporary Art, and the City Library.
Well worth spending a full day here, as there is a lot to see and do.

84. Quarantine Station

You will find this in Sydney. It is possibly the most haunted site in the country! For this reason, you may choose to go on a tour with other people, instead of alone!
These tours take about two and a half hours, and are normally only for adults, so don’t be tempted to bring the kids as they will not be allowed.
You get to visit the hospital, the morgue, and the shower block, among other things. No doubt you will hear all manner of noises as you explore the station.
Allow a full evening for this, then allow yourself a stiff drink afterwards!

85. Indoor Skydiving

If you just don’t fancy making a real skydive, then this may appeal to you. You will find the centre in Sydney, in Surfers’ paradise.
You’ll receive a comprehensive training session, so you know what to expect, and the instructors will be at hand if you need them.
Your entrance fee includes two flights and a flight certificate afterwards. You can get a video and photographs of your flight, as a keepsake.

86. Museum of Tropical Queensland

This is the perfect venue for adults and kids alike. The museum is located in Townsville, and has a huge amount of information of fauna and flora of the country.
You will learn all about the Great Barrier Reef, and Queensland in general. Many exhibits are designed for the kids and are interactive.
There is a place where you can get lunch, so if you have a bad weather day, then plan to spend it here.

87. Freycinet National Park

This park is found on the east coast of Tasmania, about 125 km northeast of Hobart. It was founded in 1916, and is the oldest park in Tasmania.
Be sure to visit Wineglass bay, which has been voted one of the ten best beaches in the world. Look out for the magnificent pink and red granite rock formations, and the jagged peaks, locally known as ‘The Hazards’.
This is the perfect place to escape to, if you enjoy walking through the bush or strolling along unspoilt beaches.

88. Carlton Brewhouse

This brewery is on the banks of the Yarra River. It is the largest brewery in Australia, and has been working for over 150 years.
Once at the brewery, you can join the guided tour which will take you around the brewery and show you the process. You will also get to sample some of the famous beers that are produced there.
There is a great restaurant and beer garden where you can relax after the tour, and have lunch, and a beer. Allow a half day for this, and make sure any visitors are over the age of 18.

89. Jet Boat on the Gold Coast

This is a great, exciting family adventure! Certainly a ‘must do’ part of your holiday! You can book your ride at Surfer’s Paradise.
You’ll love the 360-degree spins, and the wake surfing of this thrill ride along the coast! The rides take about an hour, and pass Wavebreak Island and Sovereign Island before weaving through the Aldershots mangrove channel.
After the boat ride, you may want to spend the afternoon looking around the area. There are plenty of restaurants and iconic shops to see.

90. Comedy Lounge

You will find this in Melbourne, and if you enjoy comedy shows, then be sure to head here. You will enjoy an evening of stand-up comedy, with laughs a second, with some well-known comedians.
This is in fact the longest running comedy club in the country. The shows normally last about 2.5 hours, with the option of dinner afterwards.
You must purchase your tickets in advance, either online or at the ticket office.

91. Low Isles

You get here by sailing from Port Douglas, and this is a great way to spend a day with the family. You can moor up in calm waters in the lagoon, and spend the day exploring the island.
There are boat trips that leave from the island, whish take you around the area. Normally these have glass bottoms, so you get to see the amazing marine life. Turtles are often to be see, as are many brightly coloured fish.
Allow yourself a full day here.

92. Kings Park

This is to be found on the west side of Perth. It is a combination of grassland, bushland, and botanical gardens. The views are superb of the Swan River and Darling Mountains.
There are over 80 bird species here, as well as over 200 fungi species. The park is the habitat of over 324 native plants.
This is the biggest inner-city park in the world, and also the most popular tourist destination in the country. In area, this park is larger than New York Central Park.
Look out for the State War Memorial and the Royal Kings Park Tennis Club.
If possible, try to visit during September, when the park hosts the largest wildflower show in the country.

93. See Skypoint

You will find this in Surfer’s Paradise. It is the highest point on the Gold Coast. This is not for the faint-hearted! Neither is it recommended if you are afraid of heights.
The climb lasts about 90 minutes, and will take you right to the top of the largest residential building in the world. You will have climbed over 270 metres above sea level.
If this isn’t enough, you then have the opportunity of walking around the edge of the building with a sheer drop right below you!
This is an incredible opportunity, and if you can, you should try it!

94. Cradle Mountain National Park

This park is just beautiful! This is in Tasmania near the towns of Deloraine, and Carrick. Cascading waterfalls, spectacular landscapes, and breath-taking views are what you will find here.
For hikers, there is a trail called the ‘Enchanted Forest Walk’, which is well worth taking. You will find amazing views of Dove Lake along the way.
Look out for wombats and wallabies along the way, and even a platypus or two!

Allow a full day to appreciate the beauty of this park.

95. Palm Valley

You may want to take a guided tour which leaves from Alice Springs. You will head off in a 4WD vehicle on a safari adventure, through beautiful rugged terrain.
You will pass through Finke Gorge national Park, and get to see the art gallery at Hermannsburg Aboriginal Community.
Allow yourself a full day for this, lunch is included in the tours.

96. Do a Bungy Jump

Australia is the home of Bungy Jumping, and this is possibly the ultimate adrenaline rush! As long as you are 10 years and older, you can have a go.
Head for Cairns, and you will find the fist bungy jump location in the country. Cairns is also home to the World record for the most jumps in 24 hours – a staggering 542!
After your jump you will receive a t-shirt and a certificate – if you are brave enough!

97. Visit the Tasman Peninsula

This is best done with a guided tour, which leaves from Hobart and takes about 3 hours. This is the best way (unless you have your own boat) to get down to the peninsula.
The trip winds along the shore of the Tasman national Park where you will see falcons and seals, before stopping at the Port Arthur Historic Site. Lunch in included here.
From the boat you will be able to see some of the southern hemisphere’s tallest sea cliffs, and you may get to see peregrine falcons who nest there.
Dolphins, seals, and even whales have been spotted here.

98. See Ramsey Street

No doubt you are familiar with the television series ‘Neighbours’. Well, here in Melbourne, you will be able to see the official Ramsey Street. Neighbours is the longest running soap series in Australia.
You can get behind the scenes to see how the show is produced, and who knows, you may even get to meet a star of the show!
Allow yourself a half day here.

99. Explore Boggo Road Gaol

You will find the gaol in Brisbane. The prison is famous for the dramatic escapes in the 80’s, the infamous inmates, and roof top protests.
You can learn about how the prison was run, and visit the gatehouse, yards, and F Wing where the rooftop protests were held in 1988.
Make sure you look out for the plaque with the story of the cat called Tripod, and read about Slim Halliday, who escaped twice!

Summary of 100 Best Things to Do in Australia

Although Australia is mostly desert, or semi-desert, you will find there are a diverse range of terrains, from tropical forests to beautiful beaches, and everything in between!

Australia has the greatest number of reptiles of any other country, with over 750 species, and because of the age of the country, you will find extreme weather patterns. This works to an advantage, because the country is popular with people who enjoy the outdoor lifestyle, as well as people who like to be indoors.

Whatever you enjoy when you take a holiday, there will be something in this vast country that appeals to you.









Claremont Perth Serial Killer Unsolved Murders 1997

Western Australian Police Commissioner Robert Falconer talks about the Claremont Perth Serial Killings

Jacko The Bastard

Published on May 27, 2016

In 1996/1997 a serial killer was stalking young women in Perth, Western Australia. Sarah Spiers, 18, was the first known victim. Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon disappeared from the same nightclub district in Claremont soon after, their bodies discovered sometime later. Sarah Spiers has never been found & the serial killer remains at large, the murders unsolved......

The Premier of Western Australia from the 16th of February, 1993 to the 16th of February, 2001 was Richard Fairfax Court.
It was Western Australian Premier Richard Fairfax Court that arranged and approved his close Freemason brother and to be the first non Western Australian Police Officer to be appointed the Western Australian Police Commissioner.
The Court Family along with former Premier Charles Court, who was the father to Richard Fairfax Court come form as long line of proud Freemason Brothers,

 Former Premier the late Sir Charles Court, the father of former Premier Richard Fairfax Court

Richard Fairfax Court the Former Premier of Western Australia from 1993 to 2001 .

Robert Falconer


Robert Falconer, Western Australian Police Commissioner, who is a red lodge senior repected Freemason,
who was the former head of the Victorian Drug Squad of Victoria

Robert FalconerWestern Australian Police Commissioner,
 20 June 1994 to 20 June 1999


Commissioner Falconer was of Scottish birth and joined the Victorian police in 1963. He had gained very varied experience in practical policing work and was Deputy Commissioner in charge of operations when he was appointed to the WA position. Robert Falconer was the first person without any West Australian career background to be gain the office since Matthew Smith in 1871. There is little doubt that from day one Mr Falconer had a mandate for sweeping institutional change.

He instituted the Delta Reform programme, which may be likened to a third managerial revolution in the history of WA policing. Some traditional branches were rationalised or even abolished, with widely differing outcomes. The Police Force was renamed the Western Australia Police Service. Opinion among WA police officers of the time was divided in terms of the success of the changes; few would have denied that radical reforms were necessary.

Robert FalconerWestern Australian Police Commissioner,

Killer's Confession | 9 News Perth



Published on Oct 10, 2015

There's been a potential breakthrough in at least 3 unsolved murders after a self-confessed serial killer admitted to the crimes.


Crime Investigation Australia - Hunt for a Killer The Claremont Murders

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNNF1E3mg3c&spfreload=5

hayleyjane1985

Published on Dec 18, 2013


POLICE CORRUPTION IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA. - Smuggled.com

www.smuggled.com/wapol1.htm

Australians Against Corruption (AAC) have an enormous dossier of Police ... stating that Bob Falconer the current WA Police commissioner was involved in serious corruption in Victoria in the early 1990's, when head of that state's Police Internal ... I recorded a telephone conversation between two drug squad Officers talking ...

West Australian Police Corruption

Australians Against Corruption (AAC) have an enormous dossier of Police corruption in Western Australia that is all out of proportion to the relatively small size of that state's Police force. This indicates that corruption there is out of control. On 14th October 1997, a Federal Parliamentary (Senate) Inquiry was given substantial evidence at a Melbourne hearing, stating that Bob Falconer the current WA Police commissioner was involved in serious corruption in Victoria in the early 1990's, when head of that state's Police Internal Investigations section, either in a role of facilitating or covering up illegal Police activity.

Time constraints prevent AAC from placing much of this material on the World Wide web, but we expect it to become the focus of books in the future. Avon Lovell has written a number of books about corruption in Western Australia, most notably The Mickelberg Stitch and Split Image. The WA Police force have attempted to ban both books and served a number of vexatious defamation writs on the author. Notably the author of that book, Avon Lovell, wrote a foreward for Raymond Hoser's book, The Hoser Files, which was about Police corruption in Victoria. That book was unlawfully banned by Police in Victoria, following unprecedented pressure on media and the book distributors. In spite of that ban, the first print run has sold out and the book has been reprinted to satisfy demand.

The following letter (below) is typical of many received by AAC in Melbourne from victims of Police corruption. The case involving XXXXXX (see below) has had some media publicity in WA, which in itself is rare as usually mainstream media tend to shy away from exposing official corruption.

From: XXXXX Name deleted XXXX
XXXXXX St 
XXXXXXX 
Perth Western Australia

Dear Mr Hoser,

Let me start by telling you, that on the XXXXX 1997, I recorded a telephone conversation between two drug squad Officers talking about sharing around money that they had found at a suspects home. I approached the Anti Corruption Commission with the tape. The A.C.C launched a huge investigation into Police Corruption.

Since then, my house has been raided six times by the Organised Crime Squad. Nothing illegal has ever been found. I am being harassed by the police every time I walk out the door.

I was advised by an anonymous caller (who called himself Colin) to get into contact with you regarding The Hoser Files. I was told to send Twenty Five Dollars to obtain a copy. I was briefly told what they were about, but not in great detail. If you are able to send me a copy of The Hoser Files, could you please highlight or write a quick description outlining the relevant parts.

I have enclosed copies of relevant newspaper articles regarding the tape. You can contact me anytime on the following numbers:-

Mobile -XXXXXX
Work - XXXXXX
Home - XXXXXX

Thank you for taking the time to read this,

Yours Sincerely

XXXXX

AUSTRALIANS AGAINST CORRUPTION.

UNDERGROUND BOOKS THAT THE AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT HAVE TRIED TO BAN.

BANNED CORRUPTION WEBSITES

Victoria Police Corruption - Media Suppression of the facts.

Victoria Police - How a Corruption Whistleblower Was Jailed on Falsified Charges.

Victoria Police - Charges Falsified - Police Violence, Perjury, etc, (A Routine Case).

Victoria Police Corruption - Taxi Industry - Who Murdered Peter Coe?

NSW Police Corruption.

How Corrupt Officials in The National Crime Authority Control the illegal Australian Trade in Narcotics.

Australian Wildlife Crime Website.

Smuggled-2 beats Three Defamation Writs - Internet Censorship (1).

Internet Censorship (2) - by Victorian Government Politician, State Ombudsman's Office and others.

NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service - Further Corruption.

Other Corruption Related Sites.

Scientific Papers on Reptiles, Links to Other Reptile and Wildlife Sites on the Smuggled.com server.



Scientific Papers on Reptiles, Links to Other Reptile and Wildlife Sites on the Smuggled.com server.

Non-urgent email inquiries via
the Snakebusters bookings page at:
http://www.snakebusters.com.au/sbsboo1.htm

Urgent inquiries phone:
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia:
(03) 9812 3322 or 0412 777 211

Smuggled: The Underground Trade In Australia's Wildlife.

Smuggled-2: Wildlife Trafficking, Crime And Corruption In Australia.

The Hoser Files: The Fight Against Entrenched Official Corruption.


An excerpt from the book and film

Devils Garden, the Darkest side of Perth, Western Australia…

Paul Musarri was arrested and jailed in the 1980’s for selling heroin in Perth, Western Australia. When he was on trial in the District Court of Western Australia for these charges, he yelled out from the dock and pointed to the Western Australian Police Officers that had charged him with the supply and selling of heroin criminal offences and said to the District Court Trial Judge… “….. you Honour, I accept that I have been running a business of supplying and selling heroin … but I want to ask why those police officers sitting in the front row of the court are not also charged with me because they for many years were my partners in my heroin business….”

The trial judge and the prosecution all took no notice of what Paul Musarri had yelled… Paul Musarri ended up with a long jail term and was sent out of the way down t6o Albany Prison … what happened was after and five years of Paul Musarri being in prison, members of the Western Australia Drug Squad then came to visit Paul Musarri and put a deal to Paul Musarri…

“ …  the new Western Australian Police Commissioner  Robert Falconer had approved for you to be released from jail on the condition that you sell heroin and other drugs for the Crime Syndicate he runs and is involved with …..”

Paul Musarri took the deal ….

…after 3 years of again becoming one of Perth’s top heroin dealers and buying a number of homes and cars including a luxurty home in the same multi-million City Beach Street, where the new Western Australian Police Commissioner  Robert Falconer lived … with the new Western Australian Police Commissioner  Robert Falconer and Paul Musarri and their families having Sunday barbeques together … just before the Western Australian Police Commissioner  Robert Falconer had finished his term as Western Australian Police Commissioner  and was about to return to Victoria  ….. Western Australian Police Commissioner  Robert Falconer arranged for Paul Musarri to be arrested again for heroin dealing … this meant all of Paul Musarri’s assets would be seized under the proceeds of crime act and Paul Musarri would again go back to jail…. There was a massive story in the Sunday Times,   Western Australia’s Sunday newspaper … about Paul Musarri’s arrest…

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-31/notorious-wa-drug-dealer-paolo-musarri-jailed-again/7981370

Notorious WA drug dealer Paolo Musarri jailed for selling ice to officer

Posted 

A notorious West Australian drug dealer has received a further substantial prison term for selling methylamphetamine and heroin.

Paolo Musarri, 67, has spent most of his adult life behind bars for drug offences, including conspiring to import drugs in 1984 for which he received a 15-year term.

The latest offences occurred in 2013 and 2014 and were uncovered during an investigation by the WA police's Organised Crime Squad into an interstate drug trafficking ring.

The first offence in December 2013 involved Mussari attempting to buy 361 grams of heroin.

A search of his home found more than $130,000 in cash that was going to be used to buy the drugs.

Whilst on bail for that crime, he committed the second offence by selling more than 400 grams of methylamphetamine to a man called "Vinnie" who was an undercover police officer.

Musarri's 43-year-old daughter Tammi was also involved in that deal, with the District Court hearing she was living with her father at the time and he had instructed her to get the drugs from a truck to hand over to the undercover officer.

Musarri introduced daughter to heroin

Judge Philip Eaton said at the time Tammi Musarri was "significantly" affected by drugs and had been dependent on her father to give her "free" heroin.

Musarri had introduced his daughter to heroin when she was staying with him in 1999 on one of the occasions he had been released from jail.

Judge Eaton said he had taken into account Tammi Musarri's dysfunctional upbringing in giving her an 18-month suspended jail term.

However, he imposed a term of 10 years and five months' jail on Paolo Musarri, whom the court heard now had a range of health problems including being diagnosed with cancer.

It was backdated to the time of his arrest in October 2014, and he will have to serve eight years and five months before he can be released.

Two Vietnamese men were also jailed for supplying the methylamphetamine to Musarri that was sold to the undercover officer.

Van Dieu Phan, 56, who has prior convictions for drug offences, was sentenced to seven years and seven months' jail, while 29-year-old Vihn Pham was given a four-and-a-half-year sentence.

It has been stated by witnesses that well known heroin dealer operating out of Western Australia was the main man behind Barlow and Chambers became the first Westerners to be executed under Malaysia's new tougher laws for drug offences that prescribe death for anyone convicted of having over 15 grams of heroin.

 

The Barlow and Chambers executions were the hangings in 1986 by Malaysia of two Westerners, Kevin John Barlow (Australian and British) and Brian Geoffrey Shergold Chambers (Australian) of Perth, Western Australia, for the drug trafficking of 141.9 g of heroin.

The two men became the first Westerners to be executed under Malaysia's new tougher laws for drug offences that prescribe death for anyone convicted of having over 15 grams of heroin. Barlow was born in the UK in Stoke-on-Trentand held dual British and Australian nationalities.[1] Barlow's family made appeals to UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher to make a protest about the impending execution, and Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Bill Hayden made an appeal for clemency to the Malaysian government. The executions caused public outcry and strained political relations between Australia and Malaysia at the time.

Between early 1981 and the end of 1983 Chambers had made at least twelve trips abroad to transport heroin to Australia.[3] In 1980 Chambers imported heroin to Australia using body packing techniques: Chambers placed the drugs in his anus. The rest of the load was swallowed. He used the same technique in 1981 when, on transit in Singapore, customs officers detected Chambers' two vials of personal-use heroin in his jacket pocket. He was released after bribing officers. Chambers and his then girlfriend, Susan Cheryl Jacobsen, decided to move to Melbourne to escape Perth's organised crime scene. Driving intoxicated near Penong, South Australia, Chambers crashed the vehicle. Chambers was not seriously injured; however, Jacobsen received severe injuries. Jacobsen spent several days in a coma before dying of her injuries on 20 May 1983.[

The drug run was organised by Perth criminal John Asciak. Chambers was enlisted for the job due to his experience in the task. Asciak spent much time at the residence of his girlfriend Debbie Colyer-Long and got to know her boarder, Kevin Barlow. Asciak soon learned Barlow had little money and few prospects for regular work.[5] At the time Barlow was on compensation after injuring himself at work. He was depressed, consuming a lot of alcohol and marijuana after losing his girlfriend. He had also been threatened with the repossession of his car.

Though Barlow and Chambers later testified they were tourists travelling alone who met by chance in Singapore and then opted to travel together, their meeting in Singapore in October 1983 was planned by Asciak. Chambers had previously had a meeting with Barlow in Perth to approve him for the job. To help conceal their activities, Barlow had flown to Singapore directly from Perth, while Chambers had flown there via Sydney. After the Singapore meeting they disobeyed orders by travelling together and sharing the same hotel rooms; they had been directed to stay apart.

Barlow was a novice on his first drug run; he was convinced by organisers that as Chambers was an experienced drug courier the plan would proceed smoothly. Barlow was initially confident the drug run would be successful.[

The proposed drug run had been openly discussed by John Asciak and Kevin Barlow in the household of Debbie Colyer-Long prior to the event. Colyer-Long's brother-in-law Trevor Lawson learned of it and had informed the National Crime Authority of the scheme.

Having met in Singapore, Barlow and Chambers travelled by train to Penang in Malaysia. The package of drugs had been buried on a beach in Penang. Chambers was given directions to the site and dug up the package. Barlow was present but had not known the location of the heroin.

Initial plans were that Barlow and Chambers conceal the drugs by inserting some packages into their anuses and swallowing the rest. Barlow refused to do either, the former for reasons of distaste, the latter due to health concerns with that method. Chambers relented and placed the several packages of drugs, which were within plastic carry bags and wrapped in newspaper, into a newly purchased maroon suitcase. Barlow had become very nervous after the collection of the drugs

Barlow and Chambers were observed alighting from the same taxi at Bayan Lepas International Airport on 9 November 1983. Barlow carried the maroon suitcase and entered the airport. He bypassed the luggage scanning area and approached the check-in desk. Chambers, carrying Barlow's bags, paid the taxi, entered the airport and passed through the luggage scanning area, and joined Barlow at the check-in desk. They were detained by police, as Barlow was seen to be very nervous.

Taken to an interview room they were asked to open the suitcases. Chambers opened the bags he was carrying. Barlow said he was unable to open the case he had carried and that it was Chambers' case. Chambers unlocked the case's combination locks and the drugs were found; however, he claimed he had not known the contents of the smaller carry bags the drugs were in.

When police handcuffed them, they were reportedly "shivering terribly".

They were imprisoned in Penang Prison for all of 1984 and most of 1985. The prison was overcrowded. Built in 1849 to house up to 350 prisoners, in 1984 it housed 2000 people including women and babies. Barlow and Chambers were locked in a two by three-metre square cell together with up to three other prisoners for 22 hours a day, with an exercise period being allowed only if all cellmates had behaved that day. Chambers was well liked in prison; however, Barlow had trouble adjusting, and was described as being a "lunatic" and "cracking up".

Barlow attempted to excuse his actions by claiming that he had been forced to take the trip and his girlfriend threatened to leave him if he refused









 Former Macro Take Force Boss Paul Ferguson was in about 1997 removed by the the then Western Australian Police Commissioner Robert Falconer, who was the former head of the well known to be corrupt Victorian Drug Squad, from being the Macro Take Force Boss and replaced by Inspector David Caporn, who was later made Assistant Commissioner, until David Caporn had to resign from the Western Australian Police Force be cause of a ruling of the High Court of Australia that set aside the murder conviction of Andrew Mallard, because the High Court stated that the evidence that Inspector David Caporn
 put together to that was the basis of Andrew Mallard's murder conviction was false and manufactured evidence
                                        
   Former Assistant Commissioner,  David Caporn, who had been named in Western Australian Parliament as being corrupt. and serious questions have been asked as to whether  fformer Assistant Commissioner,  David Caporn was seriously trying to catch and arrest the real Claremont Serial Killer or Killers....
......one would expect there to be more than one person involved in the 
Claremont Serial Killings....

         Crime Investigation Australia - Hunt for a Killer The Claremont Murders

Crime Investigation Australia - Hunt for a Killer The Claremont Murders


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNNF1E3mg3c&app=desktop
Crime Investigation Australia - Hunt for a Killer The Claremont Murders



  



 

                                            Nightmare begins for third family

                                                        Grant Taylor

                                                Thursday, December 22, 2016

                                          https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/nightmare-begins-for-third-family-ng-b88337795z

                                                   
                               
                                            Claremont serial killer victim Jane Rimmer

This story was first published in January 2016, 20 years after Sarah Spiers went missing from Claremont.

It was the phone call former homicide squad boss Insp. Paul Ferguson had been dreading, but also expecting.

With two unsolved murders already on his plate, his quiet Saturday afternoon would be shattered by the news that the Claremont serial killer had struck again.

“It was the worst possible thing, the worst possible thing ... you can’t help but feel guilty, ” Mr Ferguson, now retired, said.

“I knew we (investigators) had done everything possible. But we had been unable to prevent it from happening again.”


“I knew we had done everything possible” … Former Macro boss Paul Ferguson

Police tonight were refusing to confirm reports the search was linked to the Macro investigation into the Claremont serial killings.

Like the first two victims, lawyer Ciara Glennon was young, blonde, smart and attractive.

The similarities between all three were overwhelming and police would finally be forced to say the words that until then they had not dared to say in public.

“I think it’s fair to say that we certainly have fears that there is a serial killer at loose in Perth, ” State crime commander Bob Ibbotson told a press conference two days after Ciara vanished.
 

                                                               

      Steve Penn photo montage of Jane Rimmer, Sarah Spiers and Ciara Glennon - Claremont Seral killings.
                                        
                                        Continental Hotel Bay View Terrace, Claremont, Western Australia
                                         

After an extended holiday in Ireland, the 27-year-old had only recently returned to Perth to attend her sister Denise’s wedding.

On Friday, March 14, 1997, she had been having drinks at the Continental Hotel with colleagues from the law firm where she had worked before going overseas.

It was about midnight when Ciara told them she was tired, before setting off to presumably catch a taxi back to her parents’ house in nearby Mosman Park.

Her mother had warned her daughter when she had returned from Ireland about the two earlier disappearances from Claremont.

But streetwise Ciara did not think twice about walking off alone down Bay View Terrace towards Stirling Highway.

 

                                      
Inspector Paul Ferguson ex macro taskforce boss, spoke to The West Australian on the 20th anniversary of Sarah Spiers' disappearance. Picture: Ian Munro/The West Australian.

A group of young men who had been sitting at a bus stop on the highway told police they had seen her walking south, looking for a lift.

The men went back to talking among themselves and a short time later one noticed that Ciara was now much further down the road, leaning in through the passenger side window of a light-coloured car that had pulled up alongside her.

When the men looked again a few moments later, she and the car were gone.

The nightmare was about to begin for a third Perth family who would soon discover their beloved daughter was missing.

Alarm bells began ringing for Denis and Una Glennon the next morning when their daughter missed a hairdresser’s appointment and then failed to show up at her sister’s hens’ party that was organised for that afternoon.

At 4.30pm, Mr Glennon would telephone police to share his concerns.

Within hours, the Macro task force’s members had been recalled to duty and were beginning the hunt for clues all over again.

Although bitterly disappointed at having failed to prevent another murder, Mr Ferguson said his investigators also understood that a fresh case presented them with fresh investigative opportunities.

A copy photo of Ciara Glennon. Picture: Supplied.

Had the killer finally made a mistake? No expense would be spared to try to find out.

Within days, Richard Court’s government announced a $250,000 reward for information to help catch the killer — the biggest ever offered at that time.

Mr Glennon would also appear before a packed press conference to reveal the depth of his family’s despair.

“Only now do I even begin to understand the terrible trauma that the parents of Jane (Rimmer) and Sarah (Spiers) went through, ” he said.

“No parent who loves their child ... can even begin to comprehend the devastating thing that this is.”

Mr Glennon was also confident that his daughter would be found alive.

But it would not take long before his family’s worst fears were realised.

Almost three weeks after Ciara vanished, a bushwalker stumbled across her body near Pipidinny Road in Eglinton on what was then Perth’s far northern fringes.

                               
                            Sarah Spiers has never been found

The location of the body made sense to police. Eglinton was north of where the Mitchell Freeway ended.

Jane Rimmer had been dumped near the end of the Kwinana Freeway.

No attempt had been made to bury either of the bodies. Though Jane Rimmer was naked, Ciara was reportedly fully clothed.

The details of how they died have never been released, but police did confirm that the women’s gravesites had given them a valuable insight into the mind of the killer.

The public were keen to do their bit and more than 15,000 calls to the Crime Stoppers hotline were logged in the first month after Ciara disappeared. But still there was no breakthrough.

To help, Mr Glennon appealed to his network of business contacts who dug deep and established a fund to give police additional resources.

The Secure Communities Foundation raised more than $750,000 , which would help pay for international experts to join the investigation as well as funding new technologies.

One of those technologies was lie-detector testing, or polygraphs. More than 50 people of interest would sit those tests, but one man in particular would fail it.

That man was firming as the prime suspect.

WHAT WE KNOW

Friday March 14, 1997: Ciara Glennon catches up with former work colleagues at Claremont’s Continental Hotel.

Midnight: The 27-year-old lawyer says she is tired and leaves the pub to find a lift home to Mosman Park.

Minutes later a group of young men see her on Stirling Highway talking to someone in a light coloured vehicle.

When they look again, both the vehicle and Ciara were gone.



                      ‘Very raw and bittersweet’

                                                                05 JANUARY 2017

                                                                                                      http://www.mayonews.ie/news/29207-very-raw-and-bittersweet

A WESTPORT man whose daughter was murdered in Australia 20 years ago has said that the arrest of a suspected serial killer for her murder just before Christmas is a ‘very raw and bittersweet time’.


MURDERED Ciara Glennon was just when 27 when she was abducted and murdered in Perth in Western Australia.

Neill O’Neill

A WESTPORT man whose daughter was murdered in Australia 20 years ago has said that the arrest of a suspected serial killer for her murder just before Christmas is a ‘very raw and bittersweet time’.
Ciara Glennon was 27 when she was abducted and murdered in Perth, Western Australia in 1997. The body of the lawyer, whose father Denis Gleenon is a native of Westport Quay,  was discovered on April 3 that year. She was remembered last week by a former colleague as a ‘gifted young lawyer, a popular and fun-loving workmate, a loyal friend and a devoted daughter and sister’.
Bradley Robert Edwards, from Kewdale, appeared in Perth Magistrates Court on Friday, December 23, charged with the murders of Jane Rimmer in June 1996 and Ciara Glennon in March 1997.
Edwards, 48, is also accused of abducting a 17-year-old girl in February 1995 as she walked through Rowe Park in Claremont, and indecently assaulting an 18-year-old woman during a break-in at a Huntingdale home in February 1988.
He was remanded in custody to appear in Stirling Gardens Magistrates Court on January 11.
Australian media have reported that he was charged with two counts of wilful murder, two counts of deprivation of liberty, two counts of aggravated sexual penetration without consent, one count of breaking and entering, and one count of indecent assault, and that he showed no emotion as he appeared in a Perth court the day before Christmas Eve. It is understood Edwards works as an electrical engineer and has been decorated for his volunteerism and community work in the recent past. 
Police commissioner Karl O’Callaghan said Mr Edwards’ arrest was the result of the ‘biggest and most complex police investigation in Western Australian history’.
“We are being updated by the Western Australian Police, and hence it is best that I do not comment on the recent developments,” Denis Glennon futher stated to reporters. 
The Glennon family are originally from Westport. Denis Glennon worked with Bord na Mona for a time. His parents (Ciara’s grandparents) and family later moved to Sligo and Ciara Glennon’s grandfather Denis, who worked for CIE at Westport Quay, and his wife Annie, who were both well-known around Westport, continued to live in Sligo. Ciara’s father Denis played football with Deel Rovers and emigrated to Australia in the mid seventies. Ciara visited her grandparents in Sligo just months before her disappearance. Her uncle Tom Glennon, who lives in Longford, is a regular visitor to Westport and still follows the fortunes of his home town soccer club Westport United.

Serial killer
For the last 20 years these unexplained murders have been known as the ‘Claremont Serial Killings’ after the two women disappeared and were later found murdered. Ms Rimmer vanished from Claremont and her body was found in August 1996 in bushland in Wellard, about 40km from Perth. CCTV footage later emerged, showing Ms Rimmer talking to a man in the street outside the Continental Hotel. Then on March 14 1997, Ms Glennon disappeared after a night out. Her body was found less than a month later, on a deserted track in Eglinton in Perth’s north. That’s when police suspected the deaths could be linked and there may be a serial killer on the loose.It is believed Ms Glennon had also been partying at The Continental pub, now known as the Claremont Hotel, on what was St Patrick’s weekend. 
Links with other similar cases are now being investigated by police in Perth.


Claremont: the deaths that shook Perth and sparked a 20-year hunt

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/dec/23/claremont-deaths-shook-perth-sparked-20-year-hunt

                       The disappearance of several women in the Perth suburb of Claremont in the late 1990s has haunted the city for two decades

                                                  

              Ciara Glennon, the 27-year-old lawyer whose body was found in bushland in April 1997


It is the case that shocked Western Australia and shattered the safety of one of Perth’s most well-to-do suburbs. In the late 1990s, three women – all young, all blonde – disappeared from the streets of Claremont, a sleepy enclave wedged between the University of Western Australia and Cottesloe beach.

All three were last seen leaving one of two well-loved drinking holes in Claremont and walking a block towards the Stirling Highway in search of a lift. In the space of 14 months, within an area smaller than 4 sq km, all three disappeared. The bodies of two of the women were found dumped in bushland within months.

For two decades, the identity of the so-called Claremont serial killer has been a subject of public speculation and police investigation. On Friday, police charged 48-year-old Bradley Robert Edwards with two counts of murder over the deaths of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. The investigation into the disappearance and suspected murder of Sarah Spiers, the first of the three women to disappear, was declared “ongoing”.

Edwards was also charged with abducting a 17-year-old girl from the streets of Claremont in 1995 and raping her in a nearby cemetery, and with breaking into a house in Huntingdale in 1988 and indecently assaulting an 18-year-old woman.

The police commissioner, Karl O’Callaghan, said the arrest was the result of the “biggest and most complex police investigation in WA history”. The investigation began 20 years ago under the name Taskforce Macro, established after Rimmer disappeared.

Jane Rimmer

Grainy CCTV footage of the footpath outside the Continental Hotel, now the Claremont Hotel, contains the biggest unanswered clue to Rimmer’s disappearance. The minute-long video shows the 23-year-old leaning against a pole outside the hotel after midnight on 9 June 1996, apparently waiting for a ride. The childcare worker’s friends later told police she had declined to share a taxi home.

Her jacket is slung over her arms. At one point she can be seen to acknowledge a man who is also standing outside the hotel, before the camera changes view. When it moves back, she is gone.

That footage was shown to more than 700 people in the initial investigation, but was not publicly released until 2008, when WA police were forced to defend the decision to withhold the video. At the time, they said they didn’t want to risk public reaction to the “underwhelming” grainy footage narrowing the focus of their investigation.


The West Australian police commissioner, Karl O’Callaghan, announces a 48-year-old man has been charged with the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, and attacks on two other women, including the abduction of a 17-year-old in 1995. Photograph: AAP

Rimmer’s body was found in bushland near Woolcoot Road at Wellard, 45km away in Perth’s southern suburbs, two months after she disappeared.

Her parents, Trevor and Jenny Rimmer,
told Australian Story in 2004
that until that point, they had held out hope their daughter was alive.

“You wonder, when it happens, ‘Why was it my daughter that night?’ I mean, which is not a very nice thing to say, but you naturally think that,” Jenny Rimmer said. “And I think she just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. You know, it could’ve been anyone. I just couldn’t believe it.”

Seven months later, it happened to Glennon.

Ciara Glennon

By the time 27-year-old Glennon disappeared, young women in Claremont were warned not to go out alone. But Glennon didn’t intend to go far.

It was Friday, 14 March 1997, and the young lawyer had been drinking with colleagues at the Continental. About midnight, she announced she was heading home and walked towards the Stirling Highway – just 180m away – to hail a taxi.

A group of young men sitting at a bus stop on the highway told police they saw her leaning through the window of a light-coloured car, the West Australian reported. When they looked back, both she and the car were gone.

She had been due to attend her sister Donna’s hen party the next afternoon. When she didn’t show, her parents, Denis and Una Glennon, raised the alarm.

Glennon’s disappearance forced police to make the announcement they had been avoiding. Two days later, the state crime commander, Bob Ibbotson, held a press conference.

“I think it’s fair to say that we certainly have fears that there is a serial killer at loose in Perth,” he said.

Eighteen days later, on 3 April, a bushwalker discovered Glennon’s dumped body near Pipidinny Road in Eglinton.

The suburb was then the northernmost fringe of Perth, near the end of the Mitchell Freeway. Rimmer’s body had been discovered near the end of the Kwinana Freeway, to the south. Both suburbs have now been swallowed by housing developments, but were then covered in thick scrub.

Both bodies were dumped in the bushland with no attempt to conceal or bury them. Rimmer was reportedly naked, Glennon reportedly clothed.

Within days of Glennon’s disappearance, the then WA premier, Richard Court, announced a $250,000 reward for information leading to the killer’s arrest. Within a month, a hotline set up by police had received more than 15,000 calls.

The disappearance of Sarah Spiers

Five months before Rimmer was killed, another woman, Sarah Spiers, disappeared from the street outside a Claremont hotel called Club Bayview. The club was on St Quentin Avenue, just 150m from the Continental Hotel.

The 18-year-old secretary had been out celebrating Australia Day with a group of friends and was returning to the home she shared with her parents, Don and Carol.

Phone records showed her calling a taxi at 2.06am, but by the time the taxi arrived at 2.14am, she had gone. She has not been seen since.

In the weeks that followed, missing posters were plastered around Perth. They asked: “Have you seen Sarah? She was last seen at 2am, wearing a black denim jacket, beige shorts and a white T-shirt. Blonde hair, blue eyes, 5ft 4in.”

Don Spiers told the West Australian he and his wife had been bombarded with tip-offs and theories about his daughter’s disappearance for 20 years. One anonymous phone call, which he believed was from someone who knew what had happened to her directed him to a patch of bushland. He searched, but found nothing.

Edwards has not been charged over Spiers’s disapperance and her case remains unsolved.

The investigation

The man put in charge of the investigation into the suspected killings was inspector Paul Ferguson, the head of the homicide squad. Ferguson pulled other detectives into Taskforce Macro, and in the following 20 years hundreds of detectives took thousands of statements and examined more than 50 persons of interest, some of whom were named publicly.

Police conducted DNA and background checks for all 2,700 licensed taxi drivers in WA, causing some to lose their licences.

The list of suspects was lengthy. It included Mark Dixie, a British man who is serving a 34-year sentence for the rape and murder of model Sally Anne Bowman in London in 2005, and Bradley John Murdoch, now serving a life sentence for the 2001 murder of the British backpacker Peter Falconio. Both have since been ruled out.

In 2014, police tried the controversial tactic of asking persons of interest to fill out a questionnaire and provide DNA as part of a “process of elimination”, PerthNow reported at the time.

But it was not until Friday that O’Callaghan was able to announce the charging of Edwards, who appeared in court later in the day. He was remanded in custody and will appear again on 11 January.

Have the Macro Task Force fully investigated all possible people that could be involved in the Claremont Serial Killings and Abductions and all possible connection to murders and disappearances of other women in Perth and around Western Australia during the 1980's and 1990's and continuing from the year 2000 and beyond?

KAChing stated on the website www.essentialkids.com, with her statement posted on the 29th of November, 2008 ... in response to seeing a TV documentary about the Claremont Serial Killings and Abductions...
"... I have heard who is a suspect by a friend who knows someone quite high up... but it was not one of the two people mentioned as suspects on the TV documentary about the Claremont Serial Killings and Abductions ...I have also been told some of damages done to the murdered girls that have not been made public ...they also did not mention on the TV documentary about the Claremont Serial Killings and Abductions that another girl went missing close to a suburb where I was living who was traveling up to Geraldton which is north of Perth in Western Australia ..."





Man charged over killing of Irish woman in Australian serial killer case

http://www.thejournal.ie/australia-serial-killer-charged-3157003-Dec2016/

He is charged with the murders of two women – a third woman was also killed but the investigation is still open

Dec 23rd 2016

                                                 

A MAN HAS been charged in an infamous Australian serial killer case after one of the country’s longest and most complex police investigations spanning 20 years.

One of his alleged victims was Ciara Glennon, who moved to Australia with her Irish family when she was five years old. She disappeared at the age of 27.

The deaths of Glennon and two other women who disappeared from the upmarket Perth suburb of Claremont after a night out between 1996 and 1997 shocked the country and struck fear into the city.

Police struggled to pin the blame on anyone and followed thousands of leads before arresting Bradley Edwards, 48, at a home in a Perth suburb yesterday.

                                                 

Nine News Perth 

@9NewsPerth

'REST IN POWER' - Tributes are being placed in Claremont after 48yo Bradley Edwards charged over 2 of the Claremont serial killer murders.

5:06 AM - 23 Dec 2016

Source: Nine News Perth/Twitter

He was charged with the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, whose bodies were found dumped in bushland. But an investigation into the killing of Sarah Spiers remains ongoing. Her body has never been found.

Edwards, who police allege acted alone, was also accused of attacking two other women. Western Australia Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan said authorities never gave up.

In an interview with the Irish Times in 1999, Ciara Glennon’s father Denis said that “justice must prevail”, adding that finding the perpetrator would “be like closing a chapter but it also means the whole horror of what happened to Ciara will be revealed and I am not looking forward to that for any of our sakes”.

“This has already been the biggest and most complex police investigation in WA history,” said Commissioner O’Callaghan. “Hundreds of police officers have worked on this case over the past 20 years.

Operation Macro has been a massive body of work involving thousands and thousands of investigative actions.

Local media reports said Edwards showed no emotion when he appeared in court. He was remanded in custody to reappear on January 11.

Comments are closed as a man has been charged.

- © AFP, 2016 - Additional reporting Aoife Barry






Crime Investigation Australia - 
The Night Caller Eric Edgar Cooke, in Perth Western Australia 

anne jacobsen August, 2016

My heart breakes for all the victims. So many broken lives....

dandygirl6 January, 2017 How fucking scary to be killed in your own bed

How fucking scary to be killed in your own bed

How fucking scary to be killed in your own bed


Karen Hearne
 December, 2016

Dead since 1964...no recidivism here.

Nancy Campbell Gibson  January, 2016

I think police that force confessions out of people then refuse to take a second look in cases like this are are the worst type of criminals.

unanimous300  August, 2016

In the late Fifties cops had no education and were little more than corrupt criminals.

Nancy Campbell Gibson August, 2016

I've been around since then. You had bullies then, and you have bullies now. All with the spoken and unspoken consent of mainstream America. It's worse now, in my opinion, or harder to cover up.

Lellobeetle February, 2016

My husband can't stand when I watch this show because of the shrieking female reenactment actors sounding so real. I'm relegated to the headphones. This man was so evil inside. His children must have carried a heavy burden. I wonder how they turned out.

meowjiejie January, 2017

Charley Smith You know what happens.... Nothing. Absolutely nothing. They are cops. A lot of them think they are above the law.

Tesak2 January, 2016

Lellobeetle my fiancée hates that I watch these shows and I use head phones too. Idn what is wrong with me lol

Maria Da Silva December, 2016

I am so sick of this experts making excuses for this evil monsters



The Claremont serial killings: Your explainer on the murder mystery that paralysed Perth, the capital city of Western Australia

Belinda Jespen

It was the case that paralysed Perth. Three young women vanished from the same affluent suburb within the space of just 14 months; the remains of two later discovered dumped outside the city, the other never found.

For more than 19 years, police have been on the hunt for the person responsible for the so-called ‘Claremont killings’, in what has become one of the longest-running and most expensive police investigations in Australian history.

http://www.mamamia.com.au/claremont-serial-killing/

Then, this morning, an apparent breakthrough.

A 48-year-old man named Bradley Robert Edwards was taken into custody and charged with the murder of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, after officers from the Tactical Response Group stormed his Kewdale home about  7am.

Irena Ceranic 

@Irena_Ceranic

BREAKING: Kewdale man taken into custody, it's believed in relation to Claremont serial killer investigation

10:32 AM - 22 Dec 2016

The arrest has thrust the case back into the headlines, where it has appeared numerous times since the late ’90s, solidifying its place in Australian cold-case folklore.

It began with disappearance of 18-year-old Sarah Spiers.

Just after 2am on January 27, 1996, the secretary called for a taxi outside Claremont’s Club Bayview nightclub, after enjoying an evening out with friends.

She told the dispatcher she would be waiting at the corner of Stirling Highway and Stirling Road, but by the time the cab arrived eight minutes later, Sarah had vanished.

Her body has never been found.

Despite ongoing investigation Taskforce Macro the mass murderer who killed three women in affluent Perth suburb Claremont hasn't been found

Jane Rimmer, Sarah Spiers and Ciara Glennon.

Just six months later, the next tragedy would befall Claremont - the disappearance of childcare worker Jane Rimmer.

The 23-year-old was last seen alive at the Continental Hotel, where she reportedly declined her friends' offer to share a cab ride home.

Unlike Spiers, Rimmer's body was discovered a month later in Wellard, south of Perth, leading police to establish The Macro Taskforce.

Tragically, the horrific discovery was followed by that of the remains of missing lawyer Ciara Glennon in April 1997, the month after she too disappeared following a night out at the Continental.

Glennon's body was found in bushland at Eglington in the city's north.

ClaremontSerialMurdersP1

Jane Rimmer was captured talking to an unknown man prior to her disappearance. Image: WA Police

What had begun as missing person's case, had become a suspected serial killing.

The investigation was stepped up, public appeals issued and suspects targeted - one public servant was tailed by police around the clock for several years before being struck off as a person of interest, according to the ABC.

Just last year DNA evidence reportedly linked Ciara Glennon's killer to an unknown man who had sexually assaulted a teenage girl in 1995. The 17-year-old had been abducted from a Claremont street and driven to Karrakatta Cemetery where she was raped.

Prior to that, among the key pieces of evidence in the case (CCTV footage) was released to the public in 2008, showing a man approaching Jane Rimmer as she waited outside the Continental Hotel on the night of her disappearance. It's unclear whether he was ever identified.

Tiffiny Genders @tiffgenders

Getting chills as police detail charges against 48 y/o man over the #Claremont serial killings. Perth people will understand.

12:40 AM - 23 Dec 2016

 

Edwards, who appeared in Perth Magistrates Court this afternoon, has also been charged with deprivation of liberty, aggravated sexual penetration without consent, break and enter and indecent assault.

West Australian police have identified the victims of these crimes as a 17-year-old who was abducted from Claremont and sexually assaulted in 1995 and an 18-year-old who was indecently assaulted in her own bed in 1998.

He was remanded in custody to appear in Stirling Gardens Magistrates Court on January 11.

Investigations into Sarah Spiers' death remain ongoing.

 Man being questioned over serial killings including death of Irish woman Ciara Glennon

             Ciara, whose parents are both Irish emigrants, vanished after celebrating St Patrick’s Day in her home city of Perth in 1997

                                                                          http://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/man-being-questioned-over-serial-9503567

                                                                          BY KATHY ARMSTRONG

                                                                                     22 DEC 2016

                                                                           
                                                                                                     Ciara Glennon

A man is reportedly being questioned about the murder of a “lovely, fun-loving” Irish woman and two other high profile serial killings in Australia.

The man, in his 50 was arrested at a house in Kewdale, in the province of Perth on Thursday over the deaths of Ciara Glennon and two other women, which were dubbed the Claremont serial killings.

Ciara, whose parents are both Irish emigrants, vanished after celebrating St Patrick’s Day in her home city of Perth in 1997.

The 27-year-old lawyer’s body was found in bushland in Perth just weeks later.

Her heartbroken father Michael, from Westport in Co Mayo, and her mum Una, from Monaghan, had to identify her remains.

Ciara’s murder was linked to the disappearances of two other women from the same area in just 15 months and sparked a high profile police hunt for a possible serial killer.

                                                    

The Glennon family leave St Marys Cathedral after service for their daughter Ciara Eilish Glennon a 28 year old solicitor who may have been abducted from the Claremont, a suburb of Perth in Western Australia

Sarah Spiers, 18, went missing from a nightclub in January 1996 and her body was never found.

Five months later Jane Rimmer, 23, also disappeared after leaving a venue and her remains were found in Perth bushland in August 1996, she had been strangled.

Following Australia’s longest police probe, detectives stormed the man’s house on Thursday and arrested him.

They cordoned off the property as part of the cold case inquiry and removed several large bags, according to ABC News.

Neighbours claimed they heard screams coming from the hour just an hour before the police arrived.

Jim Sheffield, who lives nearby, told ABC News: “I was out the back ... doing some gardening, that was about half past 6 and I heard a real loud yell and it sounded like a scream.

“Obviously I just thought ‘well something’s going on’ because you don’t normally see those sort of police officers around.” 
It is understood that the man has not been investigated as part of the case before and is believed to have lived at the house with his daughter for several years.

Ciara’s relatives have previously paid tribute to her and spoke fondly of her regular visits to Ireland with her younger sister Denise.

Her uncle Gerry Murphy, from Waterford, said she was a “lovely fun-loving girl.”

He added: “She was full of life, loved the outdoor life and was very into sports.”

The Post Newspaper also reported last year that detectives suspect that the person or people behind the three women’s deaths might have also raped a teenage girl in 1995.

Family deals with its loss as serial killer still roams free

Sat, Feb 6, 1999,

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/family-deals-with-its-loss-as-serial-killer-still-roams-free-1.149685

Ciara Glennon was born in a bush hospital in Zambia 29 years ago when her Irish parents, Denis and Una, moved to Africa to take up teaching posts in the region. Two years ago next month she went missing from her home in Perth, Western Australia and three weeks later her body was found in bush land, 50 km north of the country's third largest city.

Her murder, at the hands of a serial killer who is believed to have murdered three young women, stunned the local community and the whole state of Western Australia mourned her death.

The Glennons went to Africa from Mayo and Monaghan and settled in Australia when Ciara was five years old. She was a bright, fun-loving, adventurous child. She gained a law degree, mastered Japanese at the University of Western Australia and had no problem securing a job with a successful local law firm.

Irrepressibly free-spirited, at the age of 26 she took a one-year career break to travel the world. During this time she visited Israel, Greece and Turkey and spent six weeks, longer than she had intended, with relatives in Ireland. In late February 1997 she returned to Perth for the wedding of her sister Denise. Her wanderlust sated, she got her old job back as a solicitor and was put in charge of a case that would have taken up most of the following two years.

She was wearing a claddagh brooch on the single-breasted jacket of her black suit when she went with colleagues for drinks at the Continental Hotel in the upmarket suburb of Claremont on the evening of Friday, March 14th. She was slim and brighteyed, with dark brown curly hair that fell past her shoulders. There was only one week until her sister's wedding, and the night was something of an early St Patrick's Day celebration. At around midnight, she left the hotel to get a taxi, anxious not to miss an early appointment the next morning. She was 10 minutes from her home.

Denis Glennon sits in the boardroom of Western Australian Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) where he has just finished a board meeting. As managing director of Environmental Solutions International, a waste processing and disposal company, he was recently appointed to the board of the EPA. In fact, but for this interruption to his schedule he would be next door with his fellow board-members, talking shop over a glass of wine.

He seems uncomfortable and understandably wary of talking to the media. His treatment at the hands of some Irish newspapers (not The Irish Times) at the time of Ciara's disappearance resulted in a written apology to him and his family.

He is well spoken, impeccably dressed. He carries a compact mobile phone and wears a wider than usual marriage band on his wedding finger. Behind him the Swan River sparkles soothingly under a clear Perth sky as he waits for the interview to begin.

When he speaks it is in the carefully measured tones of those who have suffered too much to bother wasting words. Instead of choosing to assert Ciara's personality, her talents, her essence, he phones his secretary and instructs her gently, in his still distinctly Irish accent, to fax over the eulogy he wrote for her funeral Mass. It talks more eloquently than perhaps he ever could again about who his daughter was.

Instead of answering questions about how the investigation into his daughter's death is progressing he punches numbers into his phone and calls the head of the police task force set up to catch the Claremont serial killer. He knows that without his say-so the police are unlikely to co-operate with an out-of-town journalist. "You should be fine now," he says and waits for the next question.

Ciara Glennon's story hangs heavily in the air-conditioned room. You want to ask this strong, silent Irishman how life has been over the last two years since his daughter went missing; to describe the torment they endured when her partially clothed body was found under some scrub by a passer-by three weeks later. How he and his family have coped when the man who police are 99.9 per cent sure perpetrated this atrocity is living a short drive away from their home.

"When it hits you first you are totally numb with shock. Then you go through a stage of absolute anger, a stage of questioning your faith, disbelief. You start to question the abilities of the police, and then there are periods, weeks and weeks without sleep, total exhaustion," he says.

Ciara was probably not thinking about it as she made her way along Stirling Highway in search of a taxi that night, but in the 18 months before two young women had disappeared from almost the exact same spot. Police had already highlighted the possibility of a serial killer after 18-year-old Sarah Ellen Spiers and, eight months later, 23-year-old Jane Louise Rimmer went missing. Like Ciara, both women were petite, young, attractive and well-dressed.

Sarah Ellen Spiers's body has never been found, but they found Jane Louise eight weeks after she went missing. It was 50 km south of Claremont, about four metres in from the road in dense vegetation. The Macro Taskforce was quickly established by Perth police, as it became clear that a serial killer was at large in the area.

The search for Ciara got under way immediately. By late Saturday afternoon the task force was making inquiries into her movements and by the end of the week they were imploring people to come forward with any useful information. Denise Glennon was married as planned that weekend - the bridesmaid's dress supposed to be worn by her best friend and sister left hanging in the wardrobe.

"It was a very difficult decision to go ahead with the wedding," says Denis Glennon. "But stripped of all the usual materialistic elements it was so much more meaningful and special."

Three weeks after she went missing, Ciara's body was found at a remote fishing location near Perth. The pain of this time has never left Denis Glennon's eyes but what also remains for him is the way a whole country, his business friends, the media, ordinary people took their awful family tragedy to their hearts.

Almost immediately afterwards the Secure Community Foundation was set up by Denis Glennon's colleagues to raise money for extra resources to help the police investigation. The funds paid for a DNA analyser to scan the oral swabs given by the hundreds interviewed after the murder. They paid for a retired FBI polygrapher (lie detector expert), Ron Homer, to travel to Western Australia for a month, allowing police to eliminate a large number of suspects and focus on the remaining group who had refused the test or who had failed it.

They also paid for an FBI psychological profiler to visit for a month to give police a better understanding as to the identity of the offender, his likely traits, his background, his lifestyle. The last time the funds donated by the SCF were tallied they came to A$850,000 (£390,000). It is the largest homicide investigation conducted in Australia.

In late October 1997 police in Perth identified the person they still suspect of being the Claremont serial killer. He was kept for 10 months under covert surveillance until April last year, 12 months after Ciara was found, when he was observed driving alone through Claremont's business district, stalking a girl who looked very like Ciara and the two other victims. He was interviewed at length that evening and has been under overt surveillance ever since.

A member of the Macro Taskforce said last week that the suspect, a 42-year-old civil servant, was driving home from work to his parents' house as we spoke. "He is a quiet, introverted, insignificant member of the community and the person we strongly believe is the Claremont serial killer," he said. The vital evidence they need for a conviction is proving elusive, however.

People tell you that Perth has grown up since Ciara Glennon's murder as women grow wary of going out alone, but inevitably as time goes by complacency is creeping in. The Glennon family has been dramatically altered, priorities shifted, perspectives changed.

"Previous to Ciara's murder I was no different than any other reasonably successful business man," says Denis Glennon, adding that "now life is much more about caring for our family. There has been a huge renewal in the meaning of faith amongst us."

The everyday ways in which the bitter grief has changed them are informative. Una Glennon used to watch "a reasonable amount of TV, partly crime-related stuff. Now she doesn't watch any," says Denis. Constantly travelling, he himself used to go through up to three novels a week. "Now I don't. It seems frivolous."

He does not view the apprehension of Ciara's killer in a vengeful way but "justice must prevail". "Finding the perpetrator will be like closing a chapter but it also means that the whole horror of what happened to Ciara will be revealed and I am not looking forward to that for any of our sakes," he says.

The Glennons realise that each of them must go through it in their own way. They haven't sought counselling and will not. Denis Glennon knows the statistics - that 80 per cent of marriages simply don't survive this kind of devastation - but his has come through the worst.

"You have to find the strength from somewhere," he says. "Everything is more meaningful now. We pray for Ciara all the time. When Una and I see a young woman of Ciara's age we think of her. Sometimes we choose to speak about it, sometimes we choose not to".

He chose to speak about it now for two reasons. He wanted to thank the Irish people for their support over the last two years. He also wanted to show how the tragedy has deepened the faith of the family, in the hope that it might have a positive impact on others. Faith helped them to choose between the way of hope and the way of madness. They chose hope.

"We really miss her but if we had a choice to bring her back from where she is now we wouldn't . . . we have to learn to live beyond it."






Channel 7 Report presented this picture of what the boot look like of the car that police found when they searched a car in an undercover oeration of Nothbridge, Perth...
The former head of WA's prostitution taskforce Con Bayens thought that what was in this man's boot was all that is need for an abduction and the boot was lined with blue plastic,.
the reported started on the TV Investigation that the car looked like and unmarked police car...



Above: Retired police officer that passed on the information of what he found in a man's car as above in an undercover police opperatio, which made him feel this man could be the Calremont Serial Killer, however he was shocked to realise that the Macro Task Force that was in charge of Investigating the Claremont Serial Murders did not follow the information up that he gave them about this man and the fact that he found the following in the boot that was lines with blue plastic:
Pliers, tape and wore ties , which aere all items that could be used in an abduction


http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/western-australia/claremont-serial-killings-police-piecing-together-the-life-of-bradley-robert-edwards/news-story/557f281e68cdf76d572843291ea9cef7

'Don't worry about it, we've got our man': Is this the moment police let the Claremont Killer

walk free because they were too focused on tying another man to the crime?

  • The Claremont Killer serial murders is a notorious Australian cold case
  • Three women were abducted in 1996 and 1997 from the Perth suburb
  • The cases were all strikingly similar, yet the killer has never been found
  • A former detective speaks out about a potential suspect who walked
  • Says investigators were fixed on one man, rejected all other possibilities
  • Con Bayens recalls a chilling incident which set off alarm bells
  • Case is Australia's longest running and most expensive investigation 

The Claremont killer, who abducted and murdered three young blonde women, was never captured and could still be walking the streets almost 20 years on – and it's suggested police may have let the culprit go.

Taskforce Macro have been investigaing the Perth serial murders in what has become Australia's longest running and most expensive active man hunt

The FBI, Nassar and a former Mossad agent have been called on to assist - yet the person or people responsible remain at large.

The bodies of Jane Rimmer, 23, and Ciara Glennon, 27, were found dumped in bushland in 1996 and 1997 respectively.

Scroll down for video 

Despite ongoing investigation Taskforce Macro the mass murderer who killed three women in affluent Perth suburb Claremont hasn't been found

Despite ongoing investigation Taskforce Macro the mass murderer who killed three women in affluent Perth suburb Claremont hasn't been found


Jane Rimmer's (left) body was found in 1996 two months after she disappared, Ciara Glennon's (right) was found just under three weeks after her 1997 disappearance



However, the body of the first victim, 18-year-old Sarah Spiers is yet to be found after she disappeared from a pub in the affluent Perth suburb of Claremont on Australia Day in 1996.

Police officers have now spoken out to allege the investigations were bungled, with potential suspects allowed to walk and key pieces of evidence disregarded.

A terrifying encounter with a sinister man in a car equipped with 'abduction tools' has been pinpointed as a potential moment the police allowed a prime suspect to walk away without inquiry, as they were too focused on a man they believed to be the killer.

'It seems to me the Macro taskforce was a situation where the cops really mucked up and now we've got a cover up. And that's the saddest part, that they've never said 'we made a mistake', said former West Australian officer Con Bayens.




Sarah Spiers and Jane Rimmer both disappeared after spending time at Bayview Terrace in Perth's Claremont (pictured). Ciara Glennon had been at another establishment in the precinct, just 200 metres away

The former head of WA's prostitution taskforce says police looking for the Claremont serial killer in the 1990s and 2000s were dismissive of a suspect because they were too focused on trying to tie another man to the crime.

In 2008 the man, public servant Lance Williams, was finally dismissed as a suspect after years of round-the-clock surveillance.

Mr Bayens fears investigators failed to adequately probe potential suspects he encountered while running his taskforce between July 2000 and August 2002.

One particularly harrowing night has 'haunted' him 'for years' and Mr Bayens is adamant the disturbing man he found was never properly investigated by the taskforce.

The former head of WA's prostitution taskforce Con Bayens believes the taskforce missed crucial opportunities to explore suspects - including a suspicious character he encountered in 2002

Mr Bayens recalls the chilling night he pulled over a man during an undercover operation in Highgate in 2002 - 11 kilometres away from Claremont.

The boot was lined with blue plastic and there was a pair of pliers and masking tape – disturbing equipment which he believed appeared to be for an abduction.

The driver was questioned but Mr Bayens does not know why he was cleared in inquiries by officers on Task Force Macro, which was set up to investigate the killings.

The boot was lined with blue plastic and there was a pair of pliers and masking tape – disturbing equipment which he believed appeared to be for an abduction

Mr Bayens said the head investigator into the killings had rejected his offer to pass on information from the undercover operation, which was uncovering people every night 'and every one of them had the potential to be the Claremont serial killer.'

However, his offer was rejected by the chief investigator, to his astonishment.

'He said, 'Don't worry about it, Con, we've got our man.' And those words will stick with me forever,' he said.

'That just hit about 10 on my weird s***-o-meter.'

WA Police insist they looked into the sinister man Mr Bayens encountered, but the former constable insists the enquiry never took place.

12 years after her disappearance, CCTV footage of Jane Rimmer outside Claremont's Continental Hotel was finally released. She ran into a man she seemed to recgonise just minutes before she disappeared

'What happened? Nothing. Absolutely nothing. I'd love to see the proof,' he said.

Police still believe they will find the killer, who abducted and murdered the women after they partied at nightspots in the affluent suburb of Claremont.

The three disappearances were extremely similar – as former Ferguson puts it 'they each got into the wrong car and it cost them their lives.'

Investigators believe the women trusted the drivers of the vehicles so focussed their attention on taxi drivers –taking DNA samples from thousands of registered cab drivers in the city.

The three disappearances were extremely similar – as former Ferguson puts it 'they each got into the wrong car and it cost them their lives' (the taskforce pictured in the 1990s)

The three disappearances were extremely similar – as former Ferguson puts it 'they each got into the wrong car and it cost them their lives' (the taskforce pictured in the 1990s)

The women disappeared in 1996 and 1997 in the ritzy western Perth suburb, Claremont in an area that was a hub of activity.

Sarah Spiers was just 18 years old when she became the first victim in the Claremont serial murders.

She left a nightclub in Claremont, Club Bayview, on Australia Day 1996 and called for a cab from a payphone at 2.06. By the time the taxi arrived at 2.14am, she had disappeared. Her body has never been found.

On June 6 of that year childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, disappeared from the same Claremont pub – Club Bayview after declining a lift with friends.

Her body was found two months later August 3 in dense bushland south of Perth. She was found naked, partially decomposed and covered with leaves and twigs.

The third incident occurred early the following year on March 15, 1997. Ciara Glennon, a 27-year-old lawyer, disappeared from Claremont's Continental Hotel, just 200 metres from Club Bayview in the same party precinct.

She wandered out onto the Sterling Highway, potentially in search of a taxi. A witness told police they saw her talking to someone in a car. When the witness looked back a moment later, Ciara and the car were both gone.


Sarah Spiers was just 18 years old when she became the first victim in the Claremont serial murders

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3104708/Don-t-worry-ve-got-man-moment-police-charge-hunting-Claremont-Killer-let-prime-suspect-walk-free-focused-tying-man-crime.html

The comments below have been moderated in advance.

the police wil never and have never admitted that they make mistakes thats the main reson ppl dont trust them anymore they seem to think their infalable

I thought it was just Victoria Police that were useless!!!

The Police are bungling idiots. No wonder the culprit has never been caught. Caper Cops, I'd call it.

I lived in that area during that time and the cops really did stuff this whole thing up BIG TIME.

Typical police







   Kimono Clue To A Brutal Killing of Victor Heather Cark in Victoria Park in September, 1987
                                                                               By Cyril Ayris

                                                    West Australian Newspaper 17th February, 1988

                                                    http://imgur.com/a/0Ozgt

            Brutal Murder of Victor Heather Clark in Victoria Park in September, 1987
                                 

                                                                                                                                           

                                         Detective Sergeant John Callegari holds a silken dressing gown for this picture
                                       taken by Rod Taylor of the West Australian Newspaper of the 16th of February, 1988
                                                             

Silk kimono is the key clue to Brutal Murder of Victor Heather Cark in Victoria Park in September,1987. It was dropped by a man who had brokedninto a Huntingdale residence early Monday morning the 15th of February, 1988, and then lay onto of a sleeping 18-year-old girl….

The silk kimono is the vital good clue Western Australian Police believe will help solve sex attacks the area….. Detective Sergeant Mark Kilpatrick believe that the man walked into the Huntingdale house through the back door….

West Australian Newspaper 17th February, 1988 Victor Heather Cark in Victoria Park in 1987

Picture by Rod Taylor

Detective John Calangari with the silk kimomo  Western Australian Police hope will be the clue to help them catch the killer of

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4063928/Silk-kimono-stolen-clothesline-28-years-ago-key-clue-solving-Claremont-killings-cold-case-arrest-Bradley-Robert-Edwards.html

https://www.reddit.com/r/ClaremontSerialKiller

https://www.reddit.com/r/UnresolvedMysteries/comments/5juixs/western_australian_police_have_announced_that_the/

Comment by foxymoron1:

Did anyone see the West Australian newspaper articles from the 17th of February, 1988, which links the Huntingdale silk kimono…..

 ( which the Western Australian Police say is the key DNA clue to solving the Claremont Serial Killings, because the police say they found the same DNA on the body of Ciara Glennon, the silk kimono found after the Hungtindale assault of the 18-year-old girl in her home on the 15th of February, 1988 and the girl that was abducted walking under a Clarmont Subway and the taken to the Karakatta Cemetery and raped…)…..

….to a ‘brutal killing’ in Victoria Park un 1987? A woman named Victoria Heather Clark was murdered after a man broke into her home abnd raped her. The man, named David Troy Masters ( who apparently lived in her apartment block), has  been in jail for 25 year for that murder. Police initially thought it was related to the Huntingdale attack on the 15th of February, 1988. But now the Western Australian Police now claim that committed the Huntingdale sexual assault on the 15th of February, 1988and the same silk kimono, are linked to the Claremont Serial Killer (CSK) instead… and the Western Australian Police are now saying that they are certain that whoever committed the Huntingdale sexual assault on the 15th of February, 1988, is the same person that abducted and murdered Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon in June 1996 and March 1997…

Comment by Bigwood69:

I’ve never heard about this, that could be huge!

Comment by foxymoron1:

I was on page 2 of Saturday’s West and yet I can’t find anyone anywhere talking about it!

Comment by Bigwood69:

I’s imagine there may be a strong reason that that ….

Comment by othervee:

Comment was deleted, because the comment was too controversial and maybe the website could be sued for what was said..

Comment by Bigwood69:

Holy crap. Any proof that this is the actual guy?

Comment by othervee:

I can’t find any prrof and I suspect the YouTube channel belongs to some poor guy who unfortunately share a name with the suspect. The Dr Who fanfic writer gives his location as the West Midlands, which is in the United Kingdom, and he’s the same guy as the YouTube channel.

Comment by Bigwood69:

Yeah, I said in another reply, after seeing that his location was West Midlands and only finding a single fanfic /vid I figured this was just some unfortunate dude with th same name…

Comment by othervee:

Comment was deleted, because the comment was too controversial and maybe the website could be sued for what was said..

Comment by othervee:

Possibly not the same guy  …. fanfic writer gives his location as the West Midlands..

Comment by Bigwood69:

Are you sure this is the guy? Because that guy’s profile says he lives in the West Midlands which is England

Silk kimono is the key clue in the Claremont killings: Robe stolen from backyard clothesline 28 YEARS ago 'provides DNA link between serial murder case, a teen rape and the man now charged with both'

A kimono dropped during a break-in and attempted rape of a woman in a northern Perth suburb in 1988, is believed to have been a vital clue in the case

DNA samples from the kimono matched samples recovered from body of third victim Ciara Glennon, and a woman, 17, who was sexually assaulted in 1995 

Bradley Edwards was arrested at his Kewdale property in WA on Thursday

He was charged with allegedly sexually assaulting two women, aged 17 and 18

Was also charged with wilful murder of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon in 1990s

Edwards, a stepfather, was also a volunteer at his local Little Athletics Club 

By Ashleigh Davis and Martha Azzi For Daily Mail Australia

A silk kimono stolen 28 years ago is believed to be the clue that helped solve the cold case of the Claremont killings.

In 1988 the white kimono embroidered with birds and flowers was dropped when a man broke into a Huntingdale woman's house and tried to rape her, reported Perth Now.

The man responsible reportedly dropped it while running from the house, where it was found and put into storage at WA Police's evidence recieval centre. 

 

+7

A silk kimono (pictured) stolen 28 years ago during a break-in and attempted sexual assault of an 18-year-old woman, is believed to be the clue that helped police solve the cold case of the Claremont killings

                                                                                 

Bradley Robert Edwards (left) was arrested on Thursday at his home in the Perth suburb of Kewdale. Among other charges, he was charged with two counts of murder for the deaths of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, whose bodies were found in bushland in the 1990s

Recent DNA tests on the kimono matched samples already on the police database - ones that had been recovered from the body of the third victim Ciara Glennon.

                                                                       Jane Rimmer

                                                                           Ciara Glennon

On Friday Bradley was charged with the alleged murders of Jane Rimmer (left) and Ciara Glennon (right), as well as alleged sex attacks on two other women, aged 17 and 18

                                                                                                                        Sarah Spiers


 Sarah Spiers (pictured) is believed to be the first of the three women that went missing. Her body has never been found. Police are continuing inquiries into her death. To date, Edwards has not been charged in relation to her death.

The police also matched samples from a 17-year-old woman who was abducted in Claremont in 1995 and sexually assaulted in Karrakatta cemetery nearby 

Bradley Robert Edwards was arrested at his Kewdale property in Perth on Thursday and charged with the alleged wilful murders of Jane Rimmer, 23, and Ciara Glennon, 27, whose bodies were dumped in bushland in the 1990s.

The 48-year-old who was described by a local as 'quiet and friendly,' was also charged with two counts of aggravated sexual penetration and one count of indecent assault, reported Perth Now.

He was also charged with the alleged abduction of the 17-year-old in the early hours of February 12, 1995.

At the time the 17-year-old told police she was restrained with ties and before being raped and she was unable to see her attacker due to having something placed over her head.

'It will be alleged she was restrained and forced into a vehicle and then driven to a cemetery where she was sexually assaulted,' WA Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan said.

Edwards was also charged with indecently assaulting the 18-year-old woman during a break-in at a Huntingdale home on February 15, 1988.

Locals and friends of Edwards said the man who is now living with his step-daughter rarely divulged information about himself.

'He is always very quiet ... but he is quite friendly,' a man who chose to stay anonymous said. 'He never tells anyone anything about anything that he's doing.'  

The Little athletics volunteer was described as a community figure who spent years aiding the club, ABC reported.

'He's held a number of roles in the centre over that time,' Belmont Little Athletics Centre chief executive, Vince Del Prete, said.

                                        

                                               

In a press conference on Friday police said inquiries into Ms Spiers' death are still ongoing. Pictured are officers at Edwards' property

'Fair to say it's come as a bit of a shock to those of us at the centre, and for the little league sport generally.

'What's very important from our perspective is to support the Belmont Centre now, and all of its members and families involved.'

Sarah Spiers, an 18-year-old secretary, the first of the three victims who went missing, was last seen at a Claremont nightclub in January 1996. Her body has not been found and police are continuing inquiries into her death. 

 

The deaths of three women between 1996 and 1997 sparked Australia's longest police investigation into what was dubbed the Claremont serial killings.



                                

Australia Claremont Serial Killer, 1996 - 1997, Perth, Western Australia - #9 *ARREST

 Originally Posted by CSK? View Post

Has anyone here done research on the murder of Kerry Turner? I'd be interested in any info you have, googling news articles hasn't really given me much of an insight to that murder.

She was last seen out clubbing the night before Australia day, sound familiar?

I have just done some research on Kerry Turner and what I have found is a little alarming!

Witnesses say she hopped into a blue car that was similar to a Datsun 260c. If you have a look at the first pic (from Google) and compare it to the blue car parked out the front of BRE house...

Image from Google...



Image from out the front of BRE house...


The rear end of the cars is almost identical!

lavagirl 

 Originally Posted by stalker9 View Post

Why do you say that..? He was registered at the Huntingdale address for the entire period 1988 - 99. That's not to say that he didn't rent elsewhere and fail to update his address. But we have no evidence to show that he wasn't living there - I'm sure the police will be looking into all that.

Madora bay was purchased by his folks in the 1990s while they were still registered at the huntingdale address, so it was likely a holiday home..
*edit* - Madora Bay was actually purchased in 1988. Definitely a holiday home.
*second edit* Maybe the folks spent a lot of time down in Madora Bay from June 1988..? When in 1988 was the Huntingdale attack?

Huntingdale attack in 1988 was Feb 15 (Monday) 
Interesting that KK attack was around a similar date - Feb 12.

With two murders occurring in public holiday weekends could be due to family being away at their holiday home. Though doesn't account for CG in March or KK in Feb (unless ad hoc visit) And according to this, Mandora place was purchased after Huntington attack.

jam sandwich 

Originally Posted by SB.1 View Post

If she was two years younger and went to Gosnells High she would have attended the same year as BE's brother, so good chance known to BE or his brother.

This makes me wonder if this is how they connected this assault to BE in the end.
Maybe, BE was a suspect of this in 1988 plus other people but never had enough evidence to charge anybody. Once they got a DNA match with CSK they looked at this case with more detail.
It
’s possible BE may have had a thing for this girl at high school. BE may not had any success with girls in his own year as they may have found him weird/strange or lacking personality.
Younger girls tend to be more interested in older guys as ones their own age are immature. They generally go for seniors or maybe BE thought this
….he might of thought he would have better luck with the younger ones. Maybe, he asked her out or something and she shrugged him off. Maybe, he tried a few times and gradually became more obsessed with her.
After he left school it
’s possible this obsession continued. It wouldn’t take much to find out where she lived if they both went to the same school. The fact he assaulted her inside her home and the bedroom he must have known all these details about where she lived/her bedroom etc…I just can’t see it being a random attack!
Maybe, when the files were opened again and they looked at the report the Police may have originally asked her if she suspected anyone had followed her or had previously tried it on with her. She may have mentioned BE had asked her out a few times but she wasn
’t interested….bingo, they have a name to relook at. The other possibility as someone mentioned previously is that he may have seen/met her through his younger brother. Again, this is the connection to the Edwards family.
As they didn
’t have BE DNA they looked at other things first to see any other connections. The only other clues they seemed to have that we are aware of is the upholstery fibres from a VS Commodore Series 1. Maybe, they checked to see if a car like this was ever registered to BE. If it wasn’t due to being a company vehicle it wouldn’t take much to see if this make/model was ever registered to Telecom where he worked and what was it used for. I’m sure this is how they made the two connections to BE…They were starting to build up a bit of history….hence it took a little time to arrest him for the assault/murders as they checked these details out.

YoureNicked 

Jane Rimmer video (video was taken down, since last I checked, yesterday)still haunts me. She goes out into middle of Bayview Tce and looks towards Gugeri. Was she looking up at the Railway Bridge for the person she appears to be waiting for? 

Could he have seen girls leaving Conti from up there? Was this where he lurked/ his 'observation tower' around closing time, looking for lone girls leaving Conti? Shortly after, MM appears. Then, 3 minutes later, Jane is gone so if she went with MM then his car needed to have been parked very close by, on Bayview Tce.

Maybe if he didn't get a Conti victim by closing time, he then moves his car around closer to Club Bayview and then lurks around the entrance to that Club, looking for girls leaving on their own. Hanging around outside as guys often do - maybe having a smoke (did he smoke?) or having a hotdog from the stand that people remember was there, lurking in dark doorways, sitting in car, having a burger or drink from HJ's to break up his 'stalking job'. Seeing girls leaving (what time did Church Lane attack happen? Early or late into the night?)
 

A nice, systematic routine. Scope Continental around midnight, have car handy. If no victim by time it closes, take transport close to Club Bayview, scope that doorway.
 

BE sounds like a very methodical guy - so he'd have organised his stalking like it was a job. First, scout Conti, have transport handy - then, if no success, take car to Club BV so it's handy and 'do' that venue.

All speculation.

SN76 

Originally Posted by msvinova View Post

I have just done some research on Kerry Turner and what I have found is a little alarming!

Witnesses say she hopped into a blue car that was similar to a Datsun 260c. If you have a look at the first pic (from Google) and compare it to the blue car parked out the front of BRE house...

Image from Google...



Image from out the front of BRE house...


The rear end of the cars is almost identical!


I clearly recall this case.....freaked me out back then.

Easy to see how the two said cars can be mistaken especially as it was eyewitnessed at night.

Many similar circumstances surrounding this case which could link to CSK IMO.


Grok
 

Originally Posted by Mordekai View Post

"Exactly what capacity did he work for UWA as? As a Telstra worker, contractor of a company or employee of UWA. 

And do you work in a technical capacity in your job?"

I think it was GROK who asked this back on Thread #8


He worked at UWA as a Telstra tech, employed by Telstra, and contracted out to the university to look after the uni's comms system on an intermittent basis between 2012-2015 (from memory) He filled in for the other tech for a week or two at a time, sometimes more during that period when the regular guy was on leave. He sat at the desk across from me, so I had the opportunity to chat to him some mornings in the office and in the tea room.
 

As far as the last question: why do you ask?
 
ps: I used to look forward to reading GROK when it came out. It was always far superior to the Pelican.

I asked if you were a tech so I knew if to bother asking more questions about what kind of a programmer he was.

msvinova 

Originally Posted by SN76 View Post

I clearly recall this case.....freaked me out back then.

Easy to see how the two said cars can be mistaken especially as it was eyewitnessed at night.

Many similar circumstances surrounding this case which could link to CSK IMO.

I agree! It would also explain why someone with a company car would hold onto an old car like this for so long!!

BReVeTTe 

 Originally Posted by JBA512 View Post

Seems like quite a lot of the article was sourced from here. 
Good to read all the info in an organized way

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I had hoped for some further insight, and gather we're all thinking the same on here - a bit deja vu for websleuthers - yesterday's news.
I talked to a friend or two about the CSK, and of me spending the festive tuned into WS - my associates don't seem to share this passion to the same degree, as one of them had no idea who or what I was talking about.
Not saying that heinous acts appeal to me in the Slightest, but must admit I am fascinated by the criminal mind.
There's some undercurrent to my train of thought, that I might keep myself safer by being savvied up on this stuff.

Originally Posted by Reality View Post

My gut feeling (and based on one of the comments on the Gosnells reunion Facebook page) is that he was probably bullied a bit at school. When I was at school in the 80s calling someone a "bog" was slightly derogatory. It was possibly a shortening of "bogan", but had a slightly different meaning; it referred to a person who was into heavy metal music and dressed in black. I can remember kids at school being called "bogs" and it wasn't intended to be complimentary.

It's possible he was bullied and eventually just tried to "own" that identity by running with it as a nickname.

I feel that too. As friendly or ribbing as some nicknames are carelessly designed to be, a name like boggsy probably wouldn't have helped any social inadequacy he may have carried.
He already stood out amongst his peers simply for being the biggest/tallest (and I have personally known somebody extremely tall who readily took serious offence at being asked to reach something down from a top shelf)

No disrespect intended, but when I saw the class photo in the article, at a glance it looked as if his classmates had all deliberately placed brown paper bags on their own heads, and I was struck by how they'd had the foresight to hide their own identities back then.

CP345 

Originally Posted by msvinova View Post

I agree! It would also explain why someone with a company car would hold onto an old car like this for so long!!

While I'm certainly not saying it's impossible I'd find it unlikely that BE murdered this girl in 91 but then went back to sexual assault and let his victim go at the cemetery in 95. I think once he'd crossed the murder threshold a sexual assault wouldn't have been good enough for him anymore.

BReVeTTe 

Originally Posted by CP345 View Post

While I'm certainly not saying it's impossible I'd find it unlikely that BE murdered this girl in 91 but then went back to sexual assault and let his victim go at the cemetery in 95. I think once he'd crossed the murder threshold a sexual assault wouldn't have been good enough for him anymore.

but did he actually let her go in 95?
the way I read it was that he had "left her for dead"

silver tongue

Originally Posted by marble View Post

Apologies for the off-topic post, but I can't imagine what a mind- ****** this must be for you Mordekai.

How crazy it would have been if the topic of the CSK came up at some point when you knew him and he found out you'd been a cleared POI.

The mind boggles.
 

Thanks for all the useful info you've contributed to the thread since day one.

dont believe everything you read

northwest 

 Originally Posted by CP345 View Post

While I'm certainly not saying it's impossible I'd find it unlikely that BE murdered this girl in 91 but then went back to sexual assault and let his victim go at the cemetery in 95. I think once he'd crossed the murder threshold a sexual assault wouldn't have been good enough for him anymore.

While I agree with you on the above I remember reading in the KT murder investigation that the person in the car called out her name, she then talked to the person and got in. If he was the perp in this case perhaps he had to cross that line as he could have been identified?

Article here where it states her name was called
 http://www.news.com.au/national/crim...eb3127df726998

http://www.news.com.au/national/crime/perth-teenager-kerry-turner-hitched-a-ride-and-ended-up-dead/news-story/5fc90319ac3f97ce0eeb3127df726998

marble 

 Originally Posted by CP345 View Post

While I'm certainly not saying it's impossible I'd find it unlikely that BE murdered this girl in 91 but then went back to sexual assault and let his victim go at the cemetery in 95. I think once he'd crossed the murder threshold a sexual assault wouldn't have been good enough for him anymore.

I'm not sure he "let her go" at all, many reports say "left for dead". Which, even though we don't have details, sounds like great bodily harm that could have resulted in death. There have also been a few cases I'm familiar with of serial killers not killing all of their victims for one reason or another, so I do think it's possible he may have attacked women without killing them in addition to the murders.

CP345 

 Originally Posted by northwest View Post

While I agree with you on the above I remember reading in the KT murder investigation that the person in the car called out her name, she then talked to the person and got in. If he was the perp in this case perhaps he had to cross that line as he could have been identified?


Article here where it states her name was called
 http://www.news.com.au/national/crim...eb3127df726998

Called out. Not called out her name. Called out was probably' "Hey, want a lift?'

Similar Threads

1.    Australia Australia Claremont Serial Killer, 1996 - 1997, Perth, Western Australia - #11

By bessie in forum Serial Killers

Replies: 1269

Last Post: 01-15-2017, 01:00 PM

2.    Australia Australia Claremont Serial Killer, 1996 - 1997, Perth, Western Australia - #10

By bessie in forum Serial Killers

Replies: 1455

Last Post: 01-10-2017, 03:07 AM

3.    Australia Claremont Serial Killer, 1996-1997, Perth, Western Australia - #8 ARREST*

By bessie in forum Serial Killers

Replies: 1095

Last Post: 12-28-2016, 07:23 PM

4.    Australia Claremont Serial Killer, 1996-1997, Perth, Western Australia - #7 *ARREST*

By sillybilly in forum Serial Killers

Replies: 1008

Last Post: 12-23-2016, 11:37 PM

5.    Australia Claremont Serial Killer, 1996 - 1997, Perth, Western Australia - #5

By enzeder in forum Serial Killers

Replies: 1673

Last Post: 10-11-2016, 01:26 AM

                  Perth teenager Kerry Turner hitched a ride and ended up dead

                                                                                                  June 30th, 2016

                                        

Kerry Turner, 18, was murdered after hitching a ride on June 30, 1991 after a night socialising in Perth. Source: Community Newspapers/Eastern Reporter

Marnie O’Neill and wiresnews.com.au

KERRY Turner was going to come home for dinner that Saturday night but changed her plans at the last minute go clubbing with her best mate Kylie.

It was a spur of the moment decision, made 25 years ago to the day today that would result in one of the nation’s most baffling unsolved murders.

On that June 30 night in 1991, the teenagers ended up at Perth CBD nightspot Pinocchio’s but were separated once inside.

Kerry, 18, didn’t have enough money to take a taxi all the way home to Bickley so the cabbie dropped her outside an all-night cafe in East Victoria Park.

She was stranded and alone with no way to get home. Minutes later, she was walking across Shepperton Road when a car sped up and stopped behind her.

“The person in the car called out and Kerry turned around and walked back to the car, spoke to the person, and then got in the car and left and that was the last time she was seen alive that we know of,” John Turner, Kerry’s father, told Radio 6PR.

Police hunted for the vehicle, described by witnesses as a dark blue car, similar to a Datsun 260C, which had spoked wheels, but came up empty-handed.

It was one of the few leads they had into Kerry’s disappearance.

                        

Double tragedy: Sue and John Turner, the parents of murdered Kerry Turner, had an 18-year-old son who was killed six years earlier. Source: Community Newspapers/Eastern Reporter

“It’s just mystifying that she would be so positively walking around the back of the car and getting in (unless she knew the person),” Mr Turner said.

“She never came home, you can imagine how that was for us. We think about this every single day, in some way or another we remember our daughter, so it’s always fresh.

“We miss Kerry so much, her tragic loss has left a gaping hole in our family of missing grandchildren, possibly even great-grandchildren.”

Four weeks after she disappeared, Kerry’s body was found in bushland near Canning Dam, some 40km away. She had been murdered.

It was not the first time the John and his wife Sue, who emigrated to Australia from the UK in 1970 in search of a better life, had been visited by tragedy.

Six years earlier their son Jamie, 18, died after being injected with drugs by a man who was later convicted of his manslaughter.

Mrs Turner remembered her daughter as a “bubbling, outgoing girl who enjoyed life”.

“This particular Saturday, she called me and said she was coming home,” she toldPerth’s Eastern Reporter of her final conversation with her daughter.

“Then she called me back a couple of hours later to say they’d changed the arrangements and that her and her friend were going into the city, to the nightclub.”

                                                                   

                                                                                               Perth nightclub on Murray Rd, circa 1988 Source :Twitter

Mr and Mrs Turner are pleading with anyone with information about what happened to Kerry to come forward.

They say they are confident advancements in technology and cold case investigation mean that there is a greater likelihood their daughter’s case will be solved — a quarter of a century on.

“Whatever it is, no matter how small it might be ... if they’ve got any information that might be relevant, please bring it forward,” Mr Turner told Radio 6PR.

“There is definitely a good chance I think of something coming from the continued and renewed vigour of investigation. We remain hopeful and we know that there are people that know something.”

Perth Acting Superintendent Peter Branchi said police believed there were people who knew what happened to Kerry and urged them to call Crime Stoppers.

“Over time allegiances change, people change and circumstances change, and someone who may have felt intimidated or uncomfortable sharing information with police back in the 1990s may now be in a position to do so,” he said.

The Murder of Sarah Payne

In July 2000, Sara Payne and her husband hear the news they have been dreading: the body of their 8 year old daughter, Sarah, has been found in a shallow grave

https://www.reddit.com/r/ClaremontSerialKiller/

https://www.reddit.com/r/ClaremontSerialKiller/

Police searching yard/roof of CSK's former Huntingdale Home - looks like they're searching for a body? (thewest.com.au)

submitted 8 days ago by battlesmurf

When will Police release all info? (self.ClaremontSerialKiller)

submitted 11 days ago by Kubrick1138

Anyone know think they finally worked out that BE was the suspect? (self.ClaremontSerialKiller)

submitted 17 days ago by bonkersinhonkers

Bradley Edwards' Family (self.ClaremontSerialKiller)

submitted 16 days ago by 1-800-876-5353

Car the same as vice squad's find from 1990s? (self.ClaremontSerialKiller)

submitted 17 days ago by bitawareaustralia

Brain Scratch from 3 months ago (youtu.be)

submitted 22 days ago by swim2016

Australian Story 'He Who Waits' (2004) program transcript (abc.net.au)

submitted 22 days ago by swim2016

One Afternoon. (self.ClaremontSerialKiller)

submitted 24 days ago by Ruffy1975

Bradley Edwards' quiet suburban life before his arrest (news.com.au)

submitted 27 days ago by RebecchiFamily

Old thread with links and identikit @ 2009 (mydeathspace.com)

submitted 28 days ago by swim2016

Bravincat.com snapshot from Wayback Machine, 2011 - looks to be a draft of the Kewdale Little Athletics site (web.archive.org)

submitted 1 month ago by cGt2099

Interested in the aftermath of this case being solved. (self.ClaremontSerialKiller)

submitted 1 month ago by BoxxZero

Is Bradley Edwards the Mystery Man? (i.reddituploads.com)

submitted 1 month ago by 1-800-876-5353

Bradley Robert Edwards' online presence (self.ClaremontSerialKiller)

submitted 1 month ago * by 1-800-876-5353

What do we know about Bradley Edwards? (self.ClaremontSerialKiller)

submitted 1 month ago * by 1-800-876-5353

What is known about the CSK's Huntingdale attack? (self.ClaremontSerialKiller)

submitted 1 month ago * by 1-800-876-5353

He Who Waits

PROGRAM TRANSCRIPT: Monday, 9 February , 2004 

CAROLINE JONES: Hello, I'm Caroline Jones. Tonight's story takes us inside Australia's longest-running and most expensive murder investigation. Eight years ago, three young women went missing from the wealthy Perth suburb of Claremont. Two of the girls were found murdered. The body of the third has never been discovered. Now some are suggesting that the subsequent disappearance of other young women from different areas of Perth could possibly be linked, an idea strongly rejected by the Claremont investigators. What's not in dispute is that the heartache and controversy surrounding the Claremont killings has not faded with time. Now pressure is building for a fresh approach.


ROBIN NAPPER – FORENSIC SCIENCE UNIT: People have to realise that serial killers don't walk around with horns sticking out of their head. They look like normal people. They look like your neighbour. But by night, that's when the really evil side comes out and they go off hunting and prowling for victims. And they simply just can't stop. They have to keep on and on. It's like food and water, to us.

So, there is this compulsion to kill and to keep on killing and to get better and better each time that they do it. They can't take victims unless they can actually get close to victims and be friendly and actually lure them into cars or take them away. So, the persona they will present to the world is one of a very friendly - maybe a little bit offbeat, maybe a little bit strange, but nevertheless a non-dangerous person.


BRET CHRISTIAN – EDITOR, POST NEWSPAPERS: Claremont was never looked on as a dangerous place. Claremont's a well-heeled area which has something of an entertainment centre. There's a nightclub and a hotel there. In the mid-1990s, three girls in a fairly short space of time went missing after visiting those nightspots.

Well, it totally traumatised our backyard. The girls had been there probably as kids shopping with their mothers, and then at night they would go there, you know, for fun, to have a few drinks, meet some friends, and suddenly it became a hellhole, somewhere where people disappeared from.


DON SPIERS: Sarah had been at Club Bayview in Claremont with friends of hers. When she left, her friends weren't ready to go, so she left early to make a phone call for a taxi. When the taxi-driver arrived she was not there. It was probably only three minutes after the appointment. Well, initially you like to presume that there's something minor wrong and that, you know, everything will work out - that maybe she's gone with friends somewhere and hasn't been able to return. But we knew that there was something serious wrong because Sarah just simply would not fail to communicate with us under any circumstances. You know, our love was so strong that she wouldn't do that to us, you know?


CAPTION: Sarah Spiers disappeared about 2am on 27th January 1996. She has never been found.


DON SPIEARS: People ask me, "How do you cope?" And you don't "cope" - you learn to preoccupy yourself. I mean, I keep myself so busy that my mind's occupied all the time. I only have to have two or three hours off and I start to, you know, become a bit depressed. My day starts at 5:00 in the morning and I very rarely knock off before 8:00 in the evening. I admit now - I've always sort of probably been accepted as a fairly...fairly strong and rugged sort of a character, but, um, you know, I confess I cried myself to sleep for over 12 months in the initial... in the initial journey. And, you know, I'm not ashamed. Not ashamed of that at all.


CAPTION: On 9th June 1996, four months after Sarah Spiers vanished, Jane Rimmer disappeared in similar circumstances. Believing there was a connection, the next day police set up the MACRO Task Force.


TREVOR RIMMER: The police came round and they told me that, um... .that they'd found Jane's body. And, um... .that was the... the end of the night. That just... Everything broke down. That was just so hard. Because at that time, I guess, we were still hoping against hope, in our hearts... .that she was still alive...even though we knew in our heads that the odds were very much against it.


JENNY RIMMER: You wonder when it happens, "Why was it my daughter that night?" I mean, which is not a very nice thing to say, but you naturally think that. And I think she just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. You know, it could've been anyone. I just couldn't believe it.


CAPTION: Two months later, Jane Rimmer’s body was found.


POLICE RE-CREATION: On 14 March, just over a week ago, was a night just like this. Ciara Glennon left the hotel that's just behind me and hasn't been seen since. She's the third young woman that this has occurred to in 14 months in this area.


DENIS GLENNON – PRESS CONFERENCE: Only now do I even begin to understand, um, the terrible trauma that the parents of Jane and Sarah went through, and...and the degree of empathy that I have with them now is just enormous. No parent who loves their child, even a child of 28 like Ciara was, can even begin to comprehend the devastating thing that this is in any family.


CAPTION: Nine months later, in march 1997, a third girl, Ciara Glennon went missing from Claremont.


NEWS REPORT: We want to move quickly to see if we can get information while it is fresh in people's minds. 
NEWS GRAB: We certainly have fears that there is a serial killer at loose in Perth. 
NEWS REPORTER: Police are collecting body specimens from potential suspects. 
NEWS GRAB: It wasn't, like, a prostitute or anything - just a normal family girl. It's really quite terrifying.


DET. SGT PAUL COOMBES – MACRO TASK LEADER: The State of Western Australia, I believe, was in a state of shock upon the disappearance of Ciara Glennon. For three people to disappear from relatively safe streets without a trace was very disturbing.

The investigation has continued full-time for over seven years, and that in itself is very unique. It is the biggest ever in this State and in the history of WA policing, and possibly the largest investigation ever conducted in Australia.


DAVID CAPORN – HEAD MACRO TASK FORCE: I think one of the very tangible ways that this crime could be solved is in the tracing of the particularly significant items of jewellery that are missing in relation to this case.


DET. SGT LEE: What I'm showing you now is replicas of the clothing worn by all of the girls on the night of their disappearance, firstly starting with Sarah's clothing. And in particular we'd like to locate a key ring, a sunflower key ring. Um, most notable with Jane's clothing and property is the small bag. And with Ciara's clothing, the most notable is the small brooch.


DAVID CAPRON: Those are the sort of pieces of information that could assist the task force to resolve this matter.


NEWS REPORTER: Amid growing fears the killer would strike again soon, a breakthrough - MACRO Task Force detectives swooping on a suspect at 3 o'clock Sunday morning as he prowled around Claremont streets in his car.


BRET CHRISTIAN: There is a man that the police have been watching from very early on in the investigation, and he appears to be a prime suspect. Vast amounts of resources have gone into watching his every movement, to following him, to surveilling him in all sorts of different ways.


JENNY RIMMER: Well, the only thing I can say is that if he had nothing to do with it, I feel really sorry for him. If they're so confident, I can't understand why he hasn't been charged. There's obviously something lacking after, like, seven years. They still can't put their finger on it, so it's very hard to comprehend.


BRET CHRISTIAN: I think our community's been lulled into a false sense of security by the - sort of the sly nod and the wink that, "Look, we really know who's done this. We've been watching him. "And since we've been watching him there's been no other murders." That's actually wrong. There HAVE been other murders - just not any more in Claremont.


DAVID CAPORN: We can't eliminate the possibility that there is another crime that's been committed that's linked to the Claremont crime, but there is no indication of any significance that we have had a linked one since Ciara Glennon's disappearance and, ultimately, her murder. Certainly, there have been times when the media have led the community to believe that we're only interested in one person. I can assure you that we've looked far and wide, and that as every year goes by, several people are looked at very closely.


JENNY RIMMER: I don't think it'll be solved. I think too much time has gone past. They should have caught the person by now. We know there are other girls that have gone missing, and... .I mean, I haven't heard much about a lot of those other girls.


ROBIN NAPPER: You cannot divorce the three missing girls from Claremont with all the other missing people, because it's unsolved. He's still out there.


CAPTION: At 5pm on November 8 2000, Sarah McMahon left her workplace in Claremont. She said she was going to meet a friend. She vanished without a trace. Ten days later her car was found at the Swan District Hospital.


TRISH MCMAHON: The police said no, it had nothing to do with the Claremont girls missing. We just didn't have to even think about that. It was nothing to do with that at all. But they said because of the circumstances of Sarah's disappearance, that it was highly likely that Sarah had been murdered or that she was dead. I took it the only way I could - I don't believe it. I want facts.

I don't want to have to deal with what the police THINK. I want to be able to have tangible facts. People say, "Well, you know, it's been three years, you know. "You have to get on with your life." How can we? How can we? There are so many unanswered questions.


DON SPIERS: You know, people that perpetrate these sort of activities have no...no grasp of the torment and pain that they put families through. If they could just have a bit of an insight as to what they've done to numerous people... It's not just the families - like, the brothers, sisters and parents - but there's the uncles, the cousins, the aunties, the grandparents.


JENNY RIMMER: But it's also impacted on a lot of our friends and our relations. 
We pour three glasses of champagne and an extra one for Janie, and we drink ours and enjoy it, and then we pour hers on the plaque. My girlfriends and I do that quite often, actually, on her birthday - go down there with the Blush champagne, which was her favourite. 
We...that makes you feel really good. I think, anyway. Mmm.


DON SPIERS: Our situation's a little bit different to the Glennons' and the Rimmers', because their two girls have been found. We still haven't had either of the questions answered as to where Sarah is and what's actually happened to her. Another big problem that we've had has been clairvoyants. They have been a huge torment to myself and my family in giving cryptic clues as to where Sarah might be. I remember one night early days I was down Salter Point, you know, thrashing around the swampy areas down there at 11 o'clock at night. Um...probably walking around bawling my eyes out and getting nowhere. I mean, a lot of times I've known I shouldn't have listened, but I've always thought that maybe they're using that excuse of being a clairvoyant to give me some honest facts.


TRISH MCMAHON: I've been to Melbourne, put up posters in Melbourne. I've been to Sydney, going out with the soup van. My son's travelled up the coast putting up posters. We've done as much as we can. I don't know what else to do... ..you know? I haven't got the resources. I just haven't got the resources. I...I want to be out there now.


BRET CHRISTIAN: There are about 16 murders or disappearances of women since the late 1980s that remain unsolved in Perth. That's something that hasn't really registered in the public mind - that the 16 disappearances, or a large proportion of those, could be the work of one person. I think MACRO should live up to its name and go and look at the really big picture again and try and connect the dots.


ROBIN NAPPER: The UK police service learnt a very painful lesson in the 1970s with the Yorkshire Ripper, Peter Sutcliffe. He was found almost by accident. Because of information overload, they'd been chasing other leads down the wrong path and they'd missed him, and lives could have been saved. As a result of that, one of the recommendations was the creation of the National Crime Faculty, who would do independent case reviews, so in the future when complex murder investigations occurred, an independent team would come in and look at the whole case independently to get another perspective on the investigation.

An independent case review will bring in experts from all the different fields - geographic profilers, forensic profilers, different pathologists, different investigators. And the host force gives them the material, then they literally stand back and leave them to it to do the whole review. This Claremont case has now remained unsolved for eight years, and in my view it's almost crying out for a full, comprehensive case review where we get experts from round the world, we look at world's best practice, and we adopt it to this case to try and solve it once and for all.


DAVID CAPORN: I don't know of any other investigation that has been audited and reviewed as much as the MACRO investigation. We have employed people in this State and also people in other parts of Australia with significant homicide investigation background, particularly in relation to serial crime, to conduct comprehensive reviews of the inquiry. Other things that we've done is to employ investigators within this State to review particular streams of evidence, so rather than give them the whole investigation review, we'll give them bite-sized pieces. We've also sent our case file to numerous experts throughout the world - United Kingdom, United States - allowing those people full access to our information to get opinions, views.


ROBIN NAPPER: It's how you look at the word "review". A complex investigation is like a huge jigsaw puzzle, and you cannot solve that by sending one piece of the jigsaw puzzle off to an expert overseas and asking him to tell you what the picture is. The whole point of an independent review is, you get everyone together at the same time and at the same place with the same material. That's the synergy that's solved some of the most complex murders since the Yorkshire Ripper case.


COMMANDER ANDY BAKER – HEAD HOMICIDE: Sometimes you can't see the wood for the trees. You're so close to it, you may have tunnel vision. So, you need someone to come in and say, "Step back." We have found it's been difficult for other offices, whether in the UK or across the world, to accept others coming in, but the parameters are that this is a search for truth every single time. It may hurt someone, but it's got to be a search for the truth, 'cause the truth will come out.


ROBIN NAPPER: There is so much help in there, like the National Crime Faculty in the UK, who are experts and skilled in these case reviews, who, without a doubt, would come and help in this case review.


DAVE BARCLAY: We're certainly supporting MACRO here at National Crime Faculty, but with some specific things that we have that other people don't, like the injuries database. It would be fair to say that we have not made an effective contribution to MACRO. I've had a go at it. A colleague of mine who's a specialist advisor has had a go too. We just don't have enough information at this distance.


PAUL COOMBES – MACRO TASK FORCE: I believe that the investigation team itself are still very well positioned to be able to resolve the matters. We're very confident in the advances in forensic technology, and that is one of the reasons why we have instigated a forensic review to go back to the beginning and look at what we do hold on this case. We believe that that may, with what we hold, open the case up to enable us to get to a stage where we can prosecute.


DAVE BARCLAY – NATIONAL CRIME FACULTY: Most opportunities arise from lack of thought, not lack of technology. When you look at it, it isn't DNA that solves these crimes. It's basic reassessment of the crime scene by somebody else. Helps a lot.


COMMANDER ANDY BAKER: I think if the Claremont case had been investigated in the UK, I'm not confident that it would've been detected in the UK, either. Now, from what we've seen of what's been done, it's been pretty good and pretty extensive. The thing that HASN'T been done, I think, is this giant workshop where we all get together.

The review system certainly has brought success around locking up the guilty. And more importantly, there's families that have had unanswered questions. At least we've answered some of those questions, and I've actually seen some families and communities, a weight removed from them. And as time goes on, they're a bit more at peace with what happened to their loved one.


DON SPIERS: The police that have been involved with us have been absolutely outstanding in the way that they've conducted themselves and gone out of their way to assist us. You know, even the guys that are still on the case today are always right behind us. I mean, there's no question that doesn't get answered. If I've got a problem, I tell them what it is and they make sure that I've got an answer. They're...they've been remarkable.


PAUL COOMBES: On a personal level, I suppose it is with you the whole time. I've got to know Don, in particular, fairly well and I do feel very close to him. At times it is very frustrating for me not being able to...talk to Don about where Sarah is. And we've spoken a number of times about that day, should and when we do locate Sarah - you know, how we would deal with it.


BRET CHRISTIAN: I think it's more like the Eric Cooke saga than people believe, and I think we'll find out one day that it very closely approximates that dreadful period of serial killings through the same residential area that happened in the 1960s. The women who were killed and injured by Eric Cooke - at the time that they happened, the police made public statements saying, "It's not the work of the same person." Later on, it was discovered that he was using all sorts of different methods of locating and murdering the women. He was running them down with cars, he was stabbing them, he was attacking them with axes and he was shooting people. So, there seems to be a Hollywood myth that serial killers use only one method, they operate in only one area, and that stamps them as that particular killer.


DAVID CAPORN: We can only do everything within our power to complete the investigation and hopefully have a successful resolution. It's not crystal ball stuff. It's not about a 1-hour television program where the crime occurs, you put your resources in and at the end of the show it's solved - it's just not as simple as that. But it's a matter of history that all over the world there will be crimes that are not resolved.


JENNY RIMMER: I don't feel revenge. I don't think that does any good. But I'd just like to know...you know, maybe how it all happened and who it was and...save some other poor young girl from going through the same thing.


DON SPIERS: There's probably not an hour of any day that passes that I don't think of Sarah. Until the day that she is found, there'll never be closure. No matter what the circumstances, I would like to have someone come forward. I don't want clairvoyants, but if there's someone out there that knows where our Sarah is, for them to come forward and tell me...somehow.


CAPTION: W.A. Police say there have been 10 independent reviews of ‘MACRO’, including one in the UK and four in the USA. Later this year after the current forensic review, police will ask overseas experts to conduct another comprehensive review.

Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 00



This is presumably the Claremont Serial Killer. Huge news! I'll post new articles and videos as they come through.

https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/man-charged-with-murders-of-ciara-glennon-jane-rimmer-ng-b88337901z
UPDATE: The man has been identified as 48 year old Bradley Robert Edwards

http://www.watoday.com.au/wa-news/claremont-serial-killer-man-appears-in-court-charged-with-claremont-murders-20161223-gth517.html
UPDATE 2: Press conference held by WA police, Sarah Spiers case still unresolved at time of posting:https://www.facebook.com/WAtoday/videos/10154846163674313/?pnref=story
Update 3: Quote from Western Australian Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan this morning: "We never give up". Thank God you didn't, Karl.
Update 4:https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/dec/23/claremont-killings-police-charge-man-with-of-two-women-in-1990s
Extended video of announcement: https://www.facebook.com/7NewsPerth/videos/10154267036044072/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED
I'm not especially familiar with the area the man li